Tags: Retirement | retirement | Idaho | disabled seniors

Disabled Seniors' Guide to Retiring in Idaho

By    |   Saturday, 30 May 2015 09:23 PM

Idaho has been named a top place to retire by nearly every major media outlet. The AARP praised its affordability, ample greenery and abundant local culture, but how does it fare in areas like handicap accessibility, public transportation and health care? Retirees living with disabilities will be glad to find several advocacy groups that are fighting for both their legal rights and wellness in the Gem State.

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DisAbility Rights Idaho is a group based in Boise that provides legal and advocate services to those with disabilities. Most of their services are performed free of charge. These services include the investigation of rights violations, abuse, neglect or death in facilities, promoting public policies that will improve the lives of those with disabilities, and educating people with disabilities and their families about self-advocacy. These services are performed through counseling, arbitration, and administrative reviews and appeals usually, but the organization does have the capacity to provide full legal representation in court if need be.

In the past, the group has been vital in bringing about change in public policy, including passing legislation that prohibits disability discrimination in public accommodations as part of the Idaho Human Rights Act.

The Idaho State Independent Living Council, established in 1993, promotes independent living for individuals with disabilities by assisting them in areas like technological accommodations, housing and transportation.

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Just this summer, The Disability Action Center Northwest, with offices in Moscow, Lewiston, and Coeur d'Alene, was instrumental in bringing Idaho's parks up to code under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Six of the city of Pullman's largest city parks didn't have accessible bathrooms or parking for those with disabilities. That has changed now, thanks to Idaho's disability advocates.

The Aging and Disability Resource Center, located in Boise, is another advocacy group aiming to improve the lives of those with disabilities. The center's caregiver program provides services, such as home health care, homemaking, shopping, escorting, reading and letter writing, all with the goal of assisting older persons with disabilities who are living independently in their home environment.

The state also has several public transit systems for those living in larger metropolitan areas like Boise and Pocatello. My Idaho Ride is a website that enables anyone to find a means of transit by searching their location and noting their special travel needs. The Disabled American Veterans use this service and volunteer drivers to bring veterans to the more than 30 medical centers across the state.

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Idaho has been named a top place to retire by nearly every major media outlet. The AARP praised its affordability, ample greenery and abundant local culture, but how does it fare in areas like handicap accessibility, public transportation and health care?
retirement, Idaho, disabled seniors
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2015-23-30
Saturday, 30 May 2015 09:23 PM
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