Tags: Retirement | retirement | Connecticut | disabled seniors

Disabled Seniors Guide to Retiring in Connecticut

Image: Disabled Seniors Guide to Retiring in Connecticut
Summer sunset over the Atlantic Ocean in East Haven, Connecticut. (Chhobi/Dreamstime.com)

By    |   Saturday, 06 Jun 2015 10:30 PM

Disabled seniors face unique challenges that require additional assistance, such as finding affordable housing, keeping their utilities connected, and having adequate medical care. Upon choosing their retirement in Connecticut, they will receive an array of help and support.

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In 2014, new state laws poured money into programs that help older adults and persons with disabilities. Six million dollars in bond money was allocated as grants to help  disabled seniors with home modifications, such as handrails and chairlifts, so these individuals can stay in their homes. Money was provided to boost the amounts of openings in various Medicaid home and community-based programs and supportive housing units for people with mental illnesses.

The new laws also required more training for paid caregivers who work with people who have Alzheimer’s and other dementia. New laws also require hospitals to let patients know whether their stay is classified “observation status” or “inpatient;” and offered more financial transparency regulations for privately-owned nursing homes.

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A few state programs help disabled retirees even more:
  • Renters’ Rebate Program - Elderly or disabled low-income renters can receive rebates ranging from $50-$900. The amount is determined by a graduated income scale and the rent and utility costs from the prior year. Recipients are either single or married couples who are renting an apartment or room, living in cooperative housing, or a mobile home.
  • Connecticut Home Care Program for Elders- Disabled seniors age 65 and older on the verge of staying in an institution can use the state’s home care program for services like home-delivered meals, emergency response systems, home health aides, or mental health counseling. The program and its services are based on financial means and functional dependence.
  • Property Tax Relief - The property tax exemption for disabled military veterans or their surviving spouse in their municipality is $3,000; however, if the disability is more severe, the exemptions can go up to $10,000. Any additional exemptions will depend on the veteran’s income.
  • The Circuit Breaker Program- This program gives low-income older adults and persons with disabilities a credit that lowers their tax bill depending on their income. A single person may receive a credit that’s up to $1,000 and a married couple’s credit can go up to $1,200. Some municipalities can even choose to freeze property taxes for certain older adults.
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Disabled seniors face unique challenges that require additional assistance, such as finding affordable housing, keeping their utilities connected, and having adequate medical care.
retirement, Connecticut, disabled seniors
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2015-30-06
Saturday, 06 Jun 2015 10:30 PM
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