Tags: Digestive Problems | probiotics | labels

How to Read Labels on Probiotics

By    |   Saturday, 28 Nov 2015 05:03 PM

Probiotic supplements vary significantly in their components, and it is helpful to consumers to be able to read the labels so they can choose the best probiotic for their lifestyle or health issue.

The first thing to know when buying a probiotic is that each supplement is composed of different kinds of probiotic strains. When you hear that probiotics have been shown to be good for antibiotic-associated diarrhea, for instance, you'll find that research has typically focused on various strains of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Saccharomyces boulardii.

Bacteria are identified by different strains. In the name that you'll see on the probiotics labels, the first word is the genus, or the large group to which the bacteria belong, according to "Probiotics for Dummies."

ALERT: Weird Gut Bacteria Linked to Digestion, Heart, Obesity, Brain Problems

The second word is the species, which is the individual bacteria and if there is a third word or number, it is the strain. For instance, in Lactobacillus rhamnosus, sometimes abbreviated L. rhamnosus on labels, the genus and species are indicated. In Lactobacillus acidophilus DDS-1, the third designation is for the strain.

So before you walk out of the store with a bottle of probiotics in hand, ask your doctor or research which specific strains have been researched regarding the problem you're trying to treat.

For those wanting to maintain their gut health without addressing specific problems, choose a probiotic with multiple strains, gastroenterologist Dr. Shekhar Challa told The Daily Beast.

Next on the probiotics label, look at how many colony-forming units are included in the supplement. Probiotics are measured in CFUs, and you'll typically want to buy one with at least 5 billion CFUs in it, the Beast reported.

SPECIAL: Doctor: You Can Stop Digestion Woes, Heartburn, Gas, Constipation, More

Many labels will contain information about the product being encapsulated or otherwise manufactured to assure that the live microorganisms, the probiotics, survive your stomach acid to travel through to your intestines where they do the most good.

According to Livestrong, some research indicates that probiotics in dairy products are more likely to make it through the stomach, as are supplements with special enteric coatings.

Also on the label, you'll find information on proper storage of the probiotic supplement, as some need to be refrigerated or kept away from light. It's important to pay attention to expiration dates, as the supplements are live organisms that at some point may not be viable.

Doctor: Not All Probiotics Are the Same, Some Are Dangerous! Read More Here

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Probiotic supplements vary significantly in their components, and it is helpful to consumers to be able to read the labels so they can choose the best probiotic for their lifestyle or health issue.
probiotics, labels
420
2015-03-28
Saturday, 28 Nov 2015 05:03 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved