Tags: Heart Disease | nuclear | stress test | heart

8 Things the Nuclear Stress Test Tells You About Your Heart

By    |   Wednesday, 06 Jul 2016 05:17 PM

A nuclear stress test is among several tests doctors use to check for heart disease. The tests involve monitoring the heart at rest and while a person exercises to determine the amount of stress on the heart.

Stress tests include exercising on a treadmill, using an echocardiogram to provide a graphic image of the heart’s movement, or medication for patients who can’t exercise, according to WebMD.

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In a nuclear stress test, the patient is injected with a radioactive substance so doctors can see how the heart is functioning with a special camera. They may find areas where blood flow has decreased, indicating heart problems.

Patients have electrodes placed on the chest that also are attached to an electrocardiogram. A patient walks on a treadmill so doctors see how the heart reacts to physical activity, then they monitor the heart while the patient is at rest.

A nuclear stress test may provide warnings about future heart problems or help doctors understand how to proceed on treatment for heart patients, explains MedlinePlus, a source of information from the National Institutes of Health.

Here are eight things a nuclear stress test reveals about the heart:

1. The test determines if the heart is getting enough blood flow and oxygen while a patient performs physical activity, under stress.

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2. It can tell if a person is at risk for heart disease or other related complications.

3. It may detect the cause of angina or worsening chest pain.

4. The test identifies enlargement of the heart.

5. A proper diagnosis for heart disease can be made from a nuclear stress test.

6. Doctors can learn the best treatment for heart disease following a stress test.

7. The test can find out the effectiveness of medication or heart surgery.

8. A nuclear stress test determines how well the heart is pumping for previously healthy patients or for those who have had recent heart issues, including a heart attack.

During a nuclear stress test, some people might experience fatigue, chest pain, shortness of breath, or muscle cramps in the legs and feet. In rare cases, there may be dizziness, palpitations, or chest discomfort. Patients should tell the person administering the test immediately, Medline Plus notes.

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A nuclear stress test is among several tests doctors use to check for heart disease. The tests involve monitoring the heart at rest and while a person exercises to determine the amount of stress on the heart.
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2016-17-06
Wednesday, 06 Jul 2016 05:17 PM
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