Tags: Gun Control | Nebraska | hunting | private lands

Hunting in Nebraska: 4 Things to Know About Hunting on Private Lands

By    |   Thursday, 04 Jun 2015 02:11 PM

Open land isn’t open season when it comes to hunting in Nebraska. Hunters in the Cornhusker State must be cognizant of whether the land they are hunting on is public or under private control.

Different hunting laws may apply depending on land ownership. Aside from possible arrest due to trespassing laws, hunters who take game on private land at certain times of the year could also be breaking hunting laws that might be applied differently on public land.

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Here are four things to know about hunting on private lands in Nebraska.

1. Permission
In Nebraska, it is illegal to hunt on private land without the owner’s permission, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission hunting guide. The “Big Game Hunting Guide” said hunting without permission can result in a fine of up to $500, three months in jail, and the loss of hunting privileges for up to three years.

2. Open Fields and Waters Program
The state created the Open Fields and Waters Program to give hunters and anglers more access to private lands throughout the state. The program website said it was created because there had been a decline in the number of hunters and anglers in the state. Private landowners can receive payment from the state and are protected from liability if they open their lands through the proper application process.

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3. Farmers and Ranchers
Farmers and ranchers, plus their immediate family, may hunt on land they live on without a hunting permit. But that is only for upland game birds (except turkey), squirrels, rabbits and furbearers, the NGPC guide said. Furthermore, landowners hunting antelope, deer, elk or turkey on limited landowner permits do not need a Habitat Stamp. Landowner permits for residents will be given to families that use their land for agricultural production. The size of the farm is divided by 80 acres to determine the number of permits allowed.

4. Seasons
The hunting season dates for elk (antlerless) differ on public and private lands. According to the NGPC guide, antlerless elk may be hunted mid-August through later October on private land but on public land, the start date is moved to late September. “Nebraska’s elk populations move freely between private and public land, but the majority of elk are sighted on private property,” the commission said in the guide.

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This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Open land isn't open season when it comes to hunting in Nebraska. Hunters in the Cornhusker State must be cognizant of whether the land they are hunting on is public or under private control.
Nebraska, hunting, private lands
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2015-11-04
Thursday, 04 Jun 2015 02:11 PM
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