Tags: Alzheimer's/Dementia | Memory | Chronic Forgetfulness | Alzheimers | Health | Dementia

Is Your Chronic Forgetfulness a Sign of Serious Memory Loss?

By    |   Monday, 16 Mar 2015 10:47 AM

Memory loss is a common part of aging, but Alzheimer's disease is not. Since there is no current cure for Alzheimer's and early diagnosis of any form of dementia is important for long-term health, it may be difficult to know the difference between chronic forgetfulness and more serious memory problem.

According to the National Institute on Aging, there are several steps those who are having trouble remembering can take to try and understand memory loss. Forgetfulness is something many will face with age, but mild memory problems do not always point to long-term dementia.

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Memory tools such as calendars and schedules, as well as better sleep, interaction with family and friends and exercise can improve mild memory loss. Research has shown that doctors may have a hard time recognizing dementia in patients with mild memory loss. That's why it's important to be able to self-identify issues of concern.

Stress and depression due to life changes can cause dementia-like symptoms which are usually temporary. This kind of forgetfulness can often be helped with counseling, lifestyle changes and medication.

The National Institute on Aging lists some of the symptoms to look for that could potentially indicate a serious sign of memory loss:

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- Asking the same question over and over again.
- Developing problems managing money or remembering to pay bills on time
- Not being able to follow directions
- Getting lost in a familiar place
- Becoming confused about time, people and places
- Major changes in personal care or risk taking
- Personality changes

The presence of a few of these symptoms may indicate mild cognitive impairment, which is a way to describe people who fall between normal aging and dementia. According to The Journal Practitioner, 10 percent of patients with mild cognitive impairment will develop full dementia each year.

The Alzheimer's Foundation of America suggests that while memory loss is a big part of the disease, the loss of ability to communicate, perform pre-programmed tasks and interpret sensory signals are also present in the disease.

This article is for information only and is not intended as medical advice. Talk with your doctor about your specific health and medical needs.

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Memory loss is a common part of aging, but Alzheimer's disease is not. Since there is no current cure for Alzheimer's and early diagnosis of any form of dementia is important for long-term health, it may be difficult to know the difference.
Memory, Chronic Forgetfulness, Alzheimers, Health, Dementia
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2015-47-16
Monday, 16 Mar 2015 10:47 AM
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