Tags: Gun Control | Maryland | hunting | protected species

Hunting in Maryland: 3 Animals Designated Nongame, Endangered, Threatened, and Protected Species

By    |   Monday, 01 Jun 2015 05:56 PM

When hunting in Maryland or any other state, it’s important to know which mammals and birds are legal to hunt and the open seasons for pursuing them. Here are three animals that cannot be legally hunted at all because of their designation as endangered species in the state.

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1. Delmarva Fox Squirrel (Endangered)
Unlike the common gray squirrel, which spends much of its time in trees, the Delmarva fox squirrel enjoys living mainly on the ground. The Delmarva is gray in color, too, but it’s about twice as large as the common gray squirrel, growing as long as 30 inches. Its big fluffy tail alone can extend as long as 15 inches, according to the Chesapeake Bay Program.

Also unlike the common gray squirrel, the Delmarva is quiet, preferring not to chatter much. The Delmarva originally ranged as far north as Pennsylvania and New Jersey, but it now resides almost exclusively in pockets of Maryland’s Delmarva Peninsula, its ranks decimated by hunting and the fading away of mature forests, The Washington Post said.

According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, however, scientists have been moving some of the squirrels to Delaware, Virginia, Pennsylvania and other sections of Maryland, in hopes of building populations there.

2. Upland Sandpiper (Endangered)
Still somewhat prevalent in parts of the Great Plains, the upland sandpiper is now increasingly less common in the East. Due to its round-headed shape and short bill, the bird was once known as the upland plover. Yet it is actually a member of the sandpiper family. The upland sandpiper sings with a breathy whistle.

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Populations of upland sandpipers dropped dramatically during a period of commercial hunting in the late 1800s. In eastern states, their favorite habitat of tall grass and broad-leafed weeds has since been gradually disappearing. In that region, they flock mostly to airports, the National Audubon Society said.

3. Allegheny Woodrat (Endangered)
Once found all along the Appalachians from the Tennessee River north to New York State, woodrats now exist solely in Maryland, Ohio, and the Palisades region of New Jersey. A species of packrat, the woodrat lives in mountain ridges, building nests in rock fissures and venturing out at night to collect food along with non-food goodies such as coins, bottle caps, and feathers.

Natural predators of this small, brownish-gray mammal include foxes, bobcats, snakes, and hawks. However, disease and destruction of trees and forests are largely responsible for the woodrats’ decline. Woodrats often die from exposure to raccoon roundworm, a parasite that occurs naturally in raccoons’ intestines and shows up in their scat, according to the Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey, another state where the woodrat is on the list of endangered species.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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When hunting in Maryland or any other state, it's important to know which mammals and birds are legal to hunt and the open seasons for pursuing them. Here are three animals that cannot be legally hunted at all because of their designation as endangered species.
Maryland, hunting, protected species
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2015-56-01
Monday, 01 Jun 2015 05:56 PM
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