Tags: Gun Control | hunting | tennessee | education | safety

Hunting in Tennessee: Are Safety Courses Required to Hunt in Tennessee? How Do I Pass Classes?

By    |   Sunday, 07 Jun 2015 06:53 PM

Tennessee, like most U.S. states, requires hunter education before outdoors enthusiasts can purchase a hunting license or permit.

The state's laws requiring hunter education have been in place since 1985. Tennessee requires that anyone born on or after Jan. 1, 1969, complete an agency-approved safety course prior to obtaining a hunting license in the state, according to Huntercourse.com.

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The Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency permits at least three possible situations in which hunters don't have to adhere to this requirement. The first is made for junior hunters under the age of 10. These youth must be accompanied by a licensed adult hunter at all times, and the adult must remain in close enough proximity to take possession of the firearm or weapon if needed.

The second is the state Apprentice permit option. This allows prospective hunters a one-time-only exemption that permits them to hunt without first completing the required education course. Apprentice hunters exemptions allow hunting activities for one year from date of purchase, provided the individual is accompanied by an adult licensed hunter at all times. Apprentice hunters are still required to purchase all applicable permits for the sport hunting activities in which they intend to engage.

In some situations, landowners and their children are not required to have hunter education or hunting licenses in order to hunt on their own land, according to the TWRA.

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Hunter safety courses are more than simple firearm safety instruction, although safe handling of a hunting weapon is a large part of avoiding potential injury during sport hunting. Tennessee’s basic education courses also introduce prospective hunters to standard first aid and outdoor survival skills, and their responsibilities in the areas of hunter ethics, wildlife resource management, and conservation practices.

Hunting is one of the tools used by state agencies tasked with wildlife management in the United States. These state agencies depend heavily upon raw data and observational information from hunters in constructing valuable statistics about the health and behavioral trends of various species populations.

The basic hunter education course offered by the TWRA is free of charge to all participants. It consists of at least 10 hours of classroom instruction that culminates in a written multiple-choice test that must be passed successfully. The final portion of the instruction requires participation in a live-fire exercise. The sole exemptions for this portion permitted by the TWRA are restricted to law enforcement and military personnel that are state residents and can present documentation they meet the minimum training requirements.

TWRA also offers the class instruction portion of its courses in online and digital CD format for prospective hunters to complete at their own pace or within the constraints of their schedules. There is a fee associated with the online format, and individuals must complete the test and deliver a printout of the results to agency staff when they attend a mandatory live-fire field instruction portion.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Tennessee, like most U.S. states, requires hunter education before outdoors enthusiasts can purchase a hunting license or permit.
hunting, tennessee, education, safety
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2015-53-07
Sunday, 07 Jun 2015 06:53 PM
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