Tags: Gun Control | hunting | new york | landowners | private

Hunting in New York: 4 Things for Landowners to Know About Hunting on Private Property

By    |   Thursday, 28 May 2015 08:07 PM

Hunting in New York is a big business and there are plenty of state-run spots that hunters can go to find deer, black bear, and turkey. However, there is also a good chance to take some small game, even some that are unprotected are there for the taking year round, regardless of hunting season.

As a landowner, a person might find numerous people coming to ask for permission to hunt on your land. If this is the case, when it comes to hunting in New York, here are some things that landowners need to know about hunting on their private property.

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1. ASK Signs

The most important thing for landowners to do in New York is post conspicuous signs around the boundaries of their land. These signs proclaim that this is private property and any hunting, fishing, trapping or trespassing is forbidden and prosecution is the punishment. However, there is also an ASK sticker landowners can add for people who will consider allowing hunters. These stickers are provided by the State Fish & Wildlife Management Board as well as the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and allows landowners the chance to determine who they will allow to hunt on their land. The ASK sticker can be downloaded from the state’s official website.

2. Permission

When granting permission for hunting in New York to take place on private property, the landowners can place restrictions on the hunters. For example, they can allow hunting with crossbows but now allow guns because shooting could disturb farm animals or young children. It is also possible to allow two or three hunters to track on their property, but not allow a large group to impede on their land.

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3. Liability

The state of New York sides with landowners in most liability cases if a hunter comes onto private property and something unfortunate happens. It is against the law for someone to damage property while hunting on private land, and this includes trees, branches, or shrubbery. There are very few liability lawsuits against rural landowners and usually only happens when there is willful or malicious intent by the landowner to not warn against dangers. If a landowner charges a hunter to use their land, the liability protection is eliminated.

4. Trespassing

Anyone trespassing on private property without permission of the landowner is subject to a fine up to $250 and up to 15 days in jail. It is also against the law if anyone removes a posted sign prohibiting trespassing and hunting on private property. If a landowner sees someone on their property without permission hunting in New York, they should call contact an Environmental Conservation Officer to deal with the matter.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Hunting in New York is a big business and there are plenty of state-run spots that hunters can go to find deer, black bear, and turkey. However, there is also a good chance to take some small game, even some that are unprotected are there for the taking year round.
hunting, new york, landowners, private
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2015-07-28
Thursday, 28 May 2015 08:07 PM
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