Tags: Gun Control | hunting | New Jersey | private property | landowners

Hunting in New Jersey: 9 Things for Landowners to Know About Hunting on Private Property

By    |   Friday, 29 May 2015 12:01 PM

New Jersey's laws concerning hunting on public and private land often differ greatly. It is important for all landowners to know all laws that apply to themselves as well as to any hunters on their land. Here are nine things that landowners should know about hunting on private property in New Jersey.

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  1. The same laws and regulations apply to landowners hunting on their own property that apply to them when they hunt on public land.

  2. All hunting seasons are the same on both public and private land.
  3. Under the New Jersey legislators' Landowner Liability Act, owners of private land are not required to tell hunters about any dangerous areas on the property. However, if hunters are injured on the property and malicious intent is suspected of the landowner, the landowner will be fined and punished accordingly.
  4. A hunting license is required to hunt on both private and public land.
  5. Landowners may deny access to their land or allow access to anybody that they wish. They may also charge a fee for allowing hunters to hunt on their property.
  6. Landowners are not liable for any firearm-related injuries that occur on their property by other hunters.
  7. New Jersey's Division of Fish and Wildlife established that on private land, people are allowed to hunt on Sundays. This includes deer. On all public land besides Wildlife Management Areas, hunting is banned on Sundays.

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  9. Landowners may grant partial access to hunters. This means they may designate only a certain area on their land on which hunting is allowed. If the hunters go outside of these boundaries, they are legally trespassing and landowners may press charges.
  10. Landowners hold the right to have any hunter that damages their property arrested. Hunters that damage private property may have to pay up to a $2,000 fine as well as forcibly pay restitution. Examples of property include cultivated crops, buildings, livestock, and fences.
This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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New Jersey's laws concerning hunting on public and private land often differ greatly. It is important for all landowners to know all laws that apply to themselves as well as to any hunters on their land.
hunting, New Jersey, private property, landowners
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2015-01-29
Friday, 29 May 2015 12:01 PM
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