Tags: Gun Control | hunting | New Hampshire | private property | landowners

Hunting in New Hampshire: 7 Things for Landowners to Know About Hunting on Private Property

By    |   Sunday, 31 May 2015 09:19 AM

Following long-standing tradition, hunting in New Hampshire can take place on state, federal, municipal, county, or private land. However, landowners can deny hunters on their properties, and hunting on these lands is considered a privilege, not a right. Working closely with the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, landowners experience little to no problems opening their lands to hunters. Landowners allowing hunting on their property should be aware of a few guidelines.

ALERT: Should Obama Have More Control Over Guns? Vote Now

  1. Hunters can legally enter private property to pursue game, unless the land owner has posted "No Hunting" signs. Information about signs can be found on the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department website.
  2. Landowners receive tax incentives by placing their properties under land use tax assessment. Check with local town or county officials to identify properties open for public hunting in New Hampshire.
  3. Several agencies and organizations exist to help landowners manage their property, and they provide assistance in conservation, taxation, and forestry.
  4. VOTE NOW: Is New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan Doing a Good Job?

  5. Hunting in New Hampshire requires a current, valid license for each hunter, even when hunting on privately owned property. Additionally, tags for some game species are also required. Information is available on the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department website and from county sheriff offices.
  6. Woodlands owned by paper and timber companies have been open to hunters for many decades. The companies involved work closely with the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department to manage their lands, and the properties remain open because of very few problems. As long as hunters continue to respect signs and operations occurring on the land, these lands will remain open for decades to come.
  7. Landowners can grant permission to hunters on an individual basis, and occasionally receive requests from individuals. Notify local authorities, such as your sheriff's office, for direction on how to manage the requests you may want to grant.
  8. Landowners have "no duty of care to keep such premises safe for entry or use by others for hunting, fishing, trapping, or other recreational uses," according to the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department website. However, landowners must warn everyone about known dangers on the property, such as open wells. Other exceptions apply when hunters are charged fees to hunt on private property.
This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

URGENT: Do You Support Obama's Plans for Stricter Gun Control? Vote Now

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Following long-standing tradition, hunting in New Hampshire can take place on state, federal, municipal, county, or private land. However, landowners can deny hunters on their properties, and hunting on these lands is considered a privilege, not a right.
hunting, New Hampshire, private property, landowners
413
2015-19-31
Sunday, 31 May 2015 09:19 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved