Tags: Gun Control | hunting | New Hampshire | private lands

Hunting in New Hampshire: 8 Things to Know About Hunting on Private Lands

By    |   Sunday, 31 May 2015 09:30 AM

Hunting in New Hampshire can involve big game, such as deer and elk, small game, turkeys, waterfowl, and other species. Specific regulations apply to each category and to each species. Hunting in New Hampshire requires a current, valid license for each hunter, with special provision for apprentice hunters and youth, and tags for some game species. Information is available on the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department website and from county sheriff offices.

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Hunting in New Hampshire is a long-standing tradition, and the state philosophy is that the land is open to all for hunting, but hunters should be aware of the following.
  1. Whether public or privately owned, all forests are open to hunters unless posts dictate otherwise. However, hunting on private land is a privilege, not a right. Hunters must respect the land and conduct themselves professionally.
  2. Lands posted for no hunting are sometimes available to those who directly seek permission from the landowner.
  3. Approximately 80 percent of the forestlands in the state are privately owned by individuals or corporations, according to Gun Owners of New Hampshire.
  4. Landowners receive tax incentives by placing their properties under land use tax assessment. Check with local town or county officials to identify properties open for public hunting in New Hampshire.
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  6. Several lumber and paper companies open their lands to hunters, especially in the northern parts of the state. They keep close relationships with New Hampshire Fish and Game Department to continue to keep these wildlife havens available to the public. Hunters on these properties must yield right of way to logging vehicles, stay away from wet roads, and respect gated and closed areas.
  7. Even when hunting on private lands, hunters must have a valid license, and any applicable tags, to hunt.
  8. Private lands are subject to the same regulations as public lands, including restricting activities to coincide with seasons set for specific game and respecting endangered and threatened species.
  9. Hunting on private land can present nuisances. These include noises made by ATVs or other vehicles on or near the property or overcrowded parking space. Hunters must accept the normal activities seen on these properties.
New Hampshire dedicated funds to establish the Land Conservation Investment Program in the 1990s. The program was designed to protect state lands from development, and to keep privately owned land open to hunters. Check local authorities to identify these lands and others open for hunting.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Hunting in New Hampshire can involve big game, such as deer and elk, small game, turkeys, waterfowl, and other species. Specific regulations apply to each category and to each species.
hunting, New Hampshire, private lands
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2015-30-31
Sunday, 31 May 2015 09:30 AM
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