Tags: Gun Control | hunting | kansas | summer

Hunting in Kansas: 3 Animals to Hunt in the Summer

By    |   Sunday, 24 May 2015 10:53 AM

In the Midwestern state of Kansas, summer is a time of volatile weather patterns, oppressive heat and humidity and, of course, vacation time from school and work. Sport hunting even this far out of season has viable game to offer those hunters who wish to challenge themselves, or test and develop dynamic hunting skills against challenging targets.

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1. Coyote

In Kansas, there is legal statewide hunting of these predators year round with no limit. While coyote are native species, they are highly adaptive and continue thriving alongside human development despite habitat encroachment. Their population shares many prey food sources with more at-risk predators such as various fox species indigenous to Kansas that don't adapt as well to encroachment. For this reason, population control through harvesting is encouraged. As an added bonus, there is no "dawn to dusk" restriction on the hunting of furbearing animals. Since coyote are more nocturnally active, and summer in Kansas usually involves temperatures soaring into the 1990s during the daytime hours, this offers sport hunters an opportunity to practice, develop, and hone dynamic skill sets in a more comfortable environment.

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2. Squirrel

Throughout Kansas, squirrels are in season June through February, according to the state website. This, of course, excludes their spring breeding season which is a period of high activity. Daily bag and possession limits apply. Thanks to their high adaptability and tolerance of thriving in proximity with human populations, their numbers not only increase steadily but the squirrels have outsmarted a large number of their greatest predators who avoid human concentrated areas. Thus, population control falls largely to hunters.

3. Bullfrog

Kansas is home to Cheyenne Bottoms, the nation's largest inland marsh, and Quivira National Wildlife Refuge. Both of these areas are prime habitats for bullfrogs, in addition to a broad spectrum of at-risk species that thrive in marsh ecosystems. Those hot summer months are when the bullfrogs can be heard, late in the evening. Their legal season runs July through October, statewide. However, daily bag and possession limits apply.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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In the Midwestern state of Kansas, summer is a time of volatile weather patterns, oppressive heat and humidity and, of course, vacation time from school and work. Sport hunting even this far out of season has viable game to offer hunters a challenge.
hunting, kansas, summer
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2015-53-24
Sunday, 24 May 2015 10:53 AM
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