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Hunting in Texas: 8 Things to Know About Urban Deer Hunting in Cities and Suburbs

By    |   Thursday, 04 Jun 2015 04:01 PM

With the human population booming and neighborhoods spreading into the countryside, conflict with wildlife such as white-tailed deer is inevitable – but can you hunt deer in urban settings in Texas? The answer is, maybe. It depends on where you are.

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The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department estimates 4 million deer live in Texas, and in a lot of areas, such as urban settings, the population of white-tailed deer has surpassed the land's ability to sustain them.

The removal of natural predators and the deer-friendly landscape allows deer populations to thrive year-round.

Because recreational hunting is not allowed within most residential areas, controlling deer populations is a challenge. However, there are some options when it comes to deer control in urban areas.

Here are 8 things you may want to know about urban hunting in Texas, whether it is deer or fur-bearing nuisance animals.

1. Each municipality has its own approach in controlling deer or nuisance animals. They frequently consult a wildlife biologist before making a decision on method. Those wishing to hunt in an urban setting are encouraged to contact the cities for specific guidance on what is allowed.

2. Although not officially a form of stalk-hunting, one common tool used to control urban deer is the drop net. Once the deer is trapped it is either tranquilized and transported to another release area, or taken to a processing plant where its meat is given to the poor. Permitted use of this method is restricted.

3. In order to relocate trapped deer to private land tracts, the landowner must have an approved Wildlife Management Plan; and receive Site Information Forms for every release location.

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4. Archery hunting is the recommended method in many residential areas, due to the weapon's limited shooting range and relative silence. However, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department's public deer hunt data suggests that hunter success is usually much lower with this method compared to firearms hunting.

5. Archers must get a Texas hunting license and archery certification to hunt. Special permits also are required for managed hunts.

6. Bow hunting can result in higher wounding losses and increased travel distances before deer succumb to their injury, and in urban settings this could lead to conflicts with residents.

7. In 2012 wildlife officials discussed rules for Grayson County, where an archery-only deer season was being considered as a starting point for white-tailed deer management in the Dallas metro area counties.

8. If you are hunting on your own property, you or someone you approve may take nuisance fur-bearing animals, such as squirrels or opossums, by any means, at any time without the need for a hunting or trapping license, but check with your municipality as to how that can legally be done in your area.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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With the human population booming and neighborhoods spreading into the countryside, conflict with wildlife such as white-tailed deer is inevitable – but can you hunt deer in urban settings in Texas?
hunting in texas, texas, urban deer
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2015-01-04
Thursday, 04 Jun 2015 04:01 PM
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