Tags: Gun Control | hunting in oregon | invasive species | rules

Hunting in Oregon: The 1 Invasive Species in Oregon and the State's Rules for Hunting It

By    |   Wednesday, 03 Jun 2015 04:24 PM

Oregon suffers from a number of invasive species, but most of them, in this very wet state, are aquatic critters such as bullfrogs, snapping turtles, crabs, carp, snails, and mussels – hardly challenging prey for hunting.

Oregon has managed its wildlife and natural areas pretty well over the decades, and apex predators such as the cougar, which was hunted almost to local extinction, are back, in the cougar's case in four figures.

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Even the gray wolf is making a slow return, though it is still questionable whether it will thrive. Native hunters such as these help control the numbers of what otherwise might become pests, while leaving plenty for human hunters to chase after.

There is one formidable beast, however, that is decidedly fauna non grata in the Beaver State, one which was in fact introduced by humans, and which causes grave damage to both the natural environment and to farms, gardens, and ranches throughout the state. The critter in question is that most intelligent of quadrupeds, the pig.

Yes, feral pigs are Oregon's Public Lands Enemy No. 1. Basically, they revert to their ancestral wild boar build and habits after a few generations in the wild, and they have a penchant for rooting, wallowing, and digging.

In a state where incessant rainfall provides plenty of opportunity for erosion when the soil is left bare of cover, the feral pig is a destructive critter indeed.

As The Associated Press reported (via Eugene, Oregon, TV station KVAL)
, a number of these pigs were actually released by hunters who wanted to "stock" their ranges with prey. But pigs, being awfully smart, eventually got wise to their purported benefactors' intentions.

Now, the state prohibits the selling of pig hunts (which it used to countenance in more carefree days), but requires landowners to kill or capture wild pigs they know are on their land.

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But can you, resident or visitor hunter, set your sites on gamey bacon in the Beaver State?

Well, sort of. The pigs seem to have learned to stay on private land, where fewer hunters tread. The state discourages landowners from advertising the presence of pigs to hunters, given sportsmen's previous history of actually importing the beasts.

However, if you are out hunting something else, you see wild pigs, and you have the landowner's permission to hunt his acreage, the state welcomes you to blast away.

As the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's website puts it: "If you do see a feral swine while out hunting for another animal and you have landowner’s permission, you can take the animal. You will be doing wildlife and habitat a favor."

However, they don't keep track of hunt-friendly landowners plagued by errant swine. So it's all up to the luck of the chase.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Oregon suffers from a number of invasive species, but most of them, in this very wet state, are aquatic critters such as bullfrogs, snapping turtles, crabs, carp, snails, and mussels - hardly challenging prey for hunting.
hunting in oregon, invasive species, rules
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2015-24-03
Wednesday, 03 Jun 2015 04:24 PM
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