Tags: Gun Control | hunting in north dakota | regulations | dogs

Hunting in North Dakota: Regulations for Hunting with Dogs

By    |   Monday, 01 Jun 2015 04:50 PM

A faithful and capable dog at your side is as much a part of hunting as is your gun or bow. Here are things you need to know before setting out in North Dakota with your four-legged hunting partner.

1. Training
North Dakota state law says professional "gun dog" trainers can't train or run gun dogs between April 1 and July 14, or allow a gun dog to run loose. This does not cover someone training his or her personal gun dog, provided the training is on private land with permission of the land owner and the person doing the training is present. Game birds can't be killed or captured during this time.

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2. State Permits Needed
There are several gun dog activities require a state permit and fees, according to state law. These include professional training; amateur training by a nonresident who brings more than four gun dogs into NoDak; and field trials with live wild birds. As of 2015, the permit fees for professional training or field trials are $10 for residents and $100 for nonresidents, and amateur training by a nonresident who brings more than four gun dogs into NoDak is $25.

3. Dog Training Area Permits
A professional trainer can get a permit for a dog training area (40 acres or less) as an exempt training area (train or let the dog run loose at any time) for maximum $10 a year, as spelled out in state law.

4. Rules Regarding Big Game

No animals except horses or mules can be used to hunt big game.

5. No Free Running
Don't let your hunting dog, or any dog, run loose, especially in a big-game hunting ground. Any game warden is allowed, by state law, to kill any unattended dog harassing or killing big game.

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6. Rabies
The state health department is allowed to seize, quarantine, or kill any animal – domestic, wild or stray – a state health officer or designee "has probable cause to believe the animal presents clinical symptoms of rabies." At owner's cost, if applicable.

7. Livestock Rules
Anyone may kill any dog, wolf, or coyote kept as a domestic animal if the animal is seen "killing, chasing, worrying, or damaging" livestock, or if circumstances "satisfactorily show" the animal was doing that. A dog owner is liable for any damage the dog does to livestock.

8. Nuisance Dog

"Any dog that habitually molests a person traveling peaceably on the public road or street is a public nuisance." Complaint to local judge describing the dog, judge notifies dog owner. If found a nuisance by the judge, judge can order the dog killed; court costs paid by complainant unless the dog's judged a nuisance, in which case owner pays..

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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A faithful and capable dog at your side is as much a part of hunting as is your gun or bow. Here are things you need to know before setting out in North Dakota with your four-legged hunting partner.
hunting in north dakota, regulations, dogs
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2015-50-01
Monday, 01 Jun 2015 04:50 PM
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