Tags: Gun Control | hunting in Indiana | landowners

Hunting in Indiana: 4 Things for Landowners to Know About Hunting on Private

By    |   Friday, 23 Oct 2015 03:23 PM

Indiana offers hunting opportunities on a substantial amount of public land, which is protected by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR). However, sometimes a good hunt can quickly veer off public land and into privately held territory.

Private land hunting is becoming a frequent option for those who find Indiana’s public space to be too confining. According to North American Whitetail, “since Indiana hasn’t become as over-run with outfitters as some Midwest states, private land access is still quite available with some hard work pounding the pavement and knocking on doors.”

It’s important to observe the rules when hunting on private land. Here are four things for landowners to know about hunting on private property:

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1. Permission Required
Hunters hoping to use private land must first obtain permission from the landowners, otherwise they are considered trespassing. Permission may be granted either verbally or with a private property permission form. The IDNR explicitly states, “It is illegal to hunt, trap, chase or retrieve game on private land without the consent of the landowner or tenant.”

2. License Required
Hunters using private property still need a valid hunting license in order to legally practice the sport. Furthermore, hunters must have the right type of license, as there are special permits required for waterfowl, amphibians, and turkeys. Also, landowners need a license to hunt on their own property, unless they live on a farm. A license exemption exists for owners of active farmlands, their spouses, and children who live with them. This exemption does not apply to businesses, residences, or corporations.

3. Injury Liability
If an injury occurs on private property because of a hunting accident in which the landowner is not involved, the landowner won’t be held liable. Injuries or death from hunting are considered inherent risks under Indiana law, and hunters assume sole responsibility for this risk.

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4. Dangerous Conditions
However, landowners can be held liable if an injury or death befalls hunters on their land if it’s due to a dangerous condition that the landowner had previous knowledge about. These dangerous conditions must be conveyed to the users of the private property immediately upon arrival.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Indiana offers hunting opportunities on a substantial amount of public land, which is protected by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR). However, sometimes a good hunt can quickly veer off public land and into privately held territory.
hunting in Indiana, landowners
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2015-23-23
Friday, 23 Oct 2015 03:23 PM
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