Tags: Gun Control | hunting in alaska

Hunting in Alaska: 3 Things to Know About Hunting on Private Lands

By    |   Friday, 22 May 2015 09:25 AM

Although state hunting regulations apply to private lands, it is illegal in Alaska to hunt on private land without permission. Even if hunters only need to use the land for access purposes, permission is still required. Using land without explicit permission from the landowner is trespassing. The following are three key things to know about hunting on private lands in Alaska.

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1. Native Corporations
The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act made Native Corporations the largest private landowners in the Alaska, according to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. This act gave land to each Native Corporation (there are 12 regional corporations and 224 village corporations, as created by the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act). The land totaled 45.5 million acres. Considered to be private lands, it is illegal to use these designated areas without permission. In order to hunt on land owned by Native village or regional corporations, hunters must contact the land management office for the desired area to find out about fees and permits.

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2. Easements for Access
Under Section 17(b) of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, hunters can gain permission to use the private lands of Native Corporations in order to access public lands. However, in this case, it still remains illegal to hunt on this private land. Site easements allow hunters to camp on the land for up to 24 hours, park a vehicle, or change modes of transportation, according to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Land and trail easements allow hunters to use the land and trails to access public lands and bodies of water.

3. Military Lands
In order to hunt on military land, hunters must secure a recreation access permit. Access is subject to short-notice closure and fees. Designated impact areas will never grant hunters access due to the possibility of unexplored ordnances, which are explosive weapons, such as land mines or bombs that did not explore. Because they still might detonate, there is a potential danger to hunters.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Although state hunting regulations apply to private lands, it is illegal in Alaska to hunt on private land without permission.
hunting in alaska
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2015-25-22
Friday, 22 May 2015 09:25 AM
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