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Hunting in Alaska: 3 Animals to Hunt in the Winter

By    |   Friday, 22 May 2015 08:58 AM

Through its hunting and fishing regulations, the state of Alaska seeks to promote sustainability and wildlife management. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game provides educational programs and makes policy decisions in order to make hunting in Alaska a safe, user-friendly experience for all involved. Alaska's hunting seasons and bag limits often vary, sometimes drastically, by region. The following are three animals to hunt during the winter in Alaska.

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1. Ptarmigan
Part of the grouse family, the ptarmigan is a game bird. There are three types of ptarmigans: willow, rock, and white-tailed. The largest ptarmigan species, willow ptarmigans prefer to nest in treeless areas. It can also be found near willow-lined waterways of northern, eastern, and subalpine Alaska. Compared to the other ptarmigan species, willow ptarmigans prefer wetter places.

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Rock ptarmigans make their homes in the rocky and hilly tundra of Alaska. They prefer rockier, higher, and drier breeding grounds, as compared to the willow ptarmigan. Rock ptarmigans also inhabit Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The smallest of the ptarmigan species, the white-tailed ptarmigan inhabits the mountainous regions of southeast and south-central Alaska. Unlike the rock and willow ptarmigans, white-tailed ptarmigans have tail feathers that are completely white. According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, the season for hunting ptarmigan in Alaska typically ranges from August to mid March; however, the specific dates and bag limits vary by region.

2. Lynx
According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, the lynx's long legs, black-tipped tail, and ear tufts distinguish the lynx from the bobcat. The lynx inhabits forests, and in Alaska, are usually found in conjunction with the snowshoe hare, a main source of food. Like snowshoe hares, lynx are scare in the southeast region of Alaska. Alaska's lynx-hunting season varies by region, but typically ranges from November to March. In much of the southeast part of Alaska, there are no dates in which lynx hunting is permissible. The bag limit remains constant across all Alaskan regions at two lynx per season.

3. Red Fox
Distinguished by its reddish fur coat and white-tipped tail, the red fox is native to Alaska's Kodiak Island and is currently common throughout the state. Although rarer in the southeast, there are pockets of red fox populations in the river valleys of the southeast. The red fox prefers lowland marshes and hilly regions and is also found in Alaska's tundra, along with the artic fox. Alaska's season for hunting the red fox ranges from September 1 to either mid-February or mid-March, depending on region. The bag limit varies across region. In the southeast and south-central regions of Alaska, it is illegal to hunt red foxes at any time.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Through its hunting and fishing regulations, the state of Alaska seeks to promote sustainability and wildlife management.
hunting in alaska
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2015-58-22
Friday, 22 May 2015 08:58 AM
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