Tags: Gun Control | hunting | idaho | invasive species | rules

Hunting in Idaho: 3 Invasive Species and Idaho's Rules for Hunting Them

By    |   Friday, 22 May 2015 01:03 PM

When it comes to hunting in Idaho, there are certain species considered invasive and the rules for hunting them are less restrictive than those enforced for native species.

Flora and fauna is considered invasive when it isn't indigenous to the state where it is now living. In Idaho, most of the invasive species are fish and reptiles, but there is also one type of bird, a dove, that is not native to Idaho and can be hunted without restrictions.

Here are three invasive species you can hunt year-round in Idaho, so long as you have the appropriate Idaho hunting or fishing license.

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1. Eurasian Collared-Doves
Nicknamed the "loathsome dove," the Eurasian collared-dove is considered an invasive species in Idaho. Once found only in Asia and Europe, the bird has recently expanded its range into the state.

Similar to a mourning dove, but larger and with a black collar on the top of their necks, these pale gray birds with dark primary feathers can be "taken in any amounts and at any time by holders of the appropriate valid Idaho hunting or combination hunting license, provided such taking is not in violation of state, county, or city laws, ordinances or regulations," according to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

2. Snapping Turtles
Most of Idaho's invasive species are of the reptile and amphibian variety, including snapping turtles, which can be hunted at any time with a valid Idaho hunting or fishing permit. "Unprotected (non-native) Idaho amphibians and reptiles may be taken in any amount and at any time, provided that such taking is not in violation of state, county, or city laws, ordinances or regulations," according to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

3. Bullfrogs
Bullfrogs are also considered an invasive species in Idaho and there is no limit to how many can be hunted. "There is no harvest limit, but all bullfrogs harvested must be killed prior to transport. It is illegal to possess or transport live bullfrogs, bullfrog tadpoles or bullfrog eggs," according to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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When it comes to hunting in Idaho, there are certain species considered invasive and the rules for hunting them are less restrictive than those enforced for native species.
hunting, idaho, invasive species, rules
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2015-03-22
Friday, 22 May 2015 01:03 PM
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