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Hunting in Connecticut: 3 Animals Designated Nongame, Endangered, Threatened, and Protected Species

By    |   Friday, 22 May 2015 09:44 PM

Hunting in Connecticut is open to hundreds of species, but hunters must learn about endangered, threatened and special concern species in the state. Passed in 1989, the Connecticut Endangered Species Act, protects native animals and plants from threats. The goal is to prevent extinction and protect essential habitats. The act categorizes endangered animals and plants according to their level of urgency, and the status of each is reviewed every few years.

Endangered species require documented research to demonstrate danger of extirpation. Animals declared endangered by the federal government also qualify for inclusion.

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Threatened species are documented to be likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future, including those identified by the state and those listed by the federal government.

Species of special concern include those native animals and plants that are limited to a restricted range or habitat within the state. Restrictions are made on hunting and killing these species, which prevent further decline.

Among the species of concern are mammals, several birds, and other creatures.

1. Least Shrew

This is the only mammal currently listed as endangered. A mole-like insectivore with velvety brown/gray fur, this species lives in dry, grassy fields near beachside woodlands. The decline of the shrew is related to land development near the coastlines. These are the smallest mammals in Connecticut and the first mammal to be listed as endangered, established by the states Endangered Species Act.

2. Birds

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17 birds are currently listed as endangered, and 10 are considered threatened. Among the most publicized endangered birds are the Peregrine Falcon and the Vesper Sparrow. Threatened species include the bald eagle and the great egret. The lists include birds of all sizes that live in various habitats. Reasons for decline include loss of habitats, predators, and pesticides.

3. Others (reptiles, fish, invertebrates, and amphibians)

The lists also include reptiles, fish, invertebrates, and amphibians whose decline affects our ecosystems. Three turtles appear as endangered: the bog turtle, Kemps Ridley sea turtle, and the leatherback sea turtle; while two more turtles are listed as threatened: the Atlantic green sea turtle and the loggerhead sea turtle. The entire list, with links to species profiles, can be viewed online. 

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Hunting in Connecticut is open to hundreds of species, but hunters must learn about endangered, threatened and special concern species in the state. Passed in 1989, the Connecticut Endangered Species Act, protects native animals and plants from threats.
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2015-44-22
Friday, 22 May 2015 09:44 PM
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