Tags: Gun Control | hunting | Alaska | invasive species | rules

Hunting in Alaska: 3 Invasive Species to Alaska and Its Rules for Hunting Them

By    |   Thursday, 21 May 2015 11:46 AM

Part of being a hunter may also mean that you’re called upon to help with population control of specific animals, and hunting in Alaska is no different. Many invasive species threaten the ecology of this great state, and unfortunately many have found themselves in Alaska due to human error. Currently, 16 species are identified by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game as being invasive, many of the aquatic variety. While not every animal can thrive in Alaska, a number of non-native animals do exist in the often frozen tundra.

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Here are three animals that are invasive species in Alaska:
  1. Norway Rat - These vermin got so bad on Hawadax Island that it was coined “Rat Island.” The rats invaded the island after a shipwreck in 1780, and they dominated the area for over two centuries. Fortunately, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service finally decided to eradicate the rats on this particular island in 2007. Their efforts were successful and now they have their sights set on other rat-infested islands. Tim Barry of Alaska Department of Game and Fish urges Alaskans and hunters to “help keep Alaska rat-free by watching for signs of rats, taking action to kill rats that they find, and by reporting rat sightings to their local health department or the nearest ADF&G office.”
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  3. European Starling - Starlings have proven to be a nuisance across America, as they compete with the native birds and often destroy crops. In an effort to quell these invasive birds in Alaska, and they were listed as “moderately invasive” in 2011’s Alaska Natural Heritage Program, courtesy of the University of Alaska Anchorage. There is no closed season for starlings, and there is no limit to how many one hunter can kill. 
  4. Rock Dove - Also called a feral pigeon, rock doves are non-native to Alaska and cause harm, as they are resilient and can often out-compete the native birds. Like starlings, there is no closed season for these pigeons and no bag limit.
This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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Part of being a hunter may also mean that you're called upon to help with population control of specific animals, and hunting in Alaska is no different.
hunting, Alaska, invasive species, rules
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2015-46-21
Thursday, 21 May 2015 11:46 AM
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