Tags: Gun Control | hunting | Alaska | information | permit

Hunting in Alaska: 7 Things to Know Before Applying for a Hunting Permit for Adults

By    |   Thursday, 21 May 2015 11:13 AM

Hunting in Alaska takes careful planning and attention to detail. There are many regulations and other factors to consider when devising an expedition there. Here are seven things to know before applying for a hunting permit in Alaska as an adult:
    ALERT: Should Obama Have More Control Over Guns? Vote Now

  1. Hunter Education Requirement - In order to hunt in Alaska, all hunters have to complete a Basic Hunter Education course to hunt in the Eagle River Management Area, Eklutna Lake Management Area, Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge, Mendenhall Wetlands State Game Refuge, and Palmer/Wasilla Management Area. There are other weapons restricted areas for archery, shotgun and muzzleloader that enforce more certification depending on the weapon used.
  2. Resident Versus Nonresident - An Alaska resident is defined by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game as “a person (including an alien) who is physically present in Alaska with the intent to remain indefinitely and make a home here, has maintained that person's domicile in Alaska for the 12 consecutive months immediately preceding this application for a license, and is not claiming residency or obtaining benefits under a claim of residency in another state, territory, or country; a member of the military service or U.S. Coast Guard who has been stationed in Alaska for the 12 consecutive months immediately preceding this application for a license; or a dependent of a resident member of the military service or U.S. Coast Guard who has lived in Alaska for the 12 consecutive months immediately preceding this application for a license. A person who does not otherwise qualify as a resident may not qualify by virtue of an interest in an Alaska business.” Nonresidents are defined as anyone not meeting the above requirements. Hunting rights are different for residents than they are for nonresidents so it is important to know your status.
  3. General Season Hunts - General season hunts have less restrictions when compared to permit hunts. However, hunters are still required to submit their harvest tickets and reports, as well as carry harvest ticket(s) in the field at all times.
  4. Types of Permit Hunts - There are six types of permits available in Alaska, and all can change according to demand and game population. Drawing hunts limit the number of hunters and must be applied for in November and December. Permits for drawing hunts are given out by a random lottery. Registration hunts do not limit the number of permits, but they have stringent hunting boundaries. Targeted hunts act like registration hunts, but hunters can only apply during precise tiers. Tier I and Tier II hunts are for residents only. Community subsistence harvest hunts are decided upon by the Board of Game to contain bag limits for a group, rather than an individual.
  5. VOTE NOW: Is Alaska Sen. Dan Sullivan Doing a Good Job?

  6. Using a Guide - All nonresidents must be accompanied by an Alaska-licensed guide or a resident, 19  years or older within the second degree of kindred, when hunting brown/grizzly bear, Dall sheep, or mountain goat. All nonresident aliens must be escorted by an official guide to hunt any big game animal. Some drawing hunts also require a guide/client contract.
  7. Know Who Owns the Land Where You Plan to Hunt - Covering over 600,000 square miles, Alaska is comprised of state lands, state park lands, state refuge lands, federal public land, military lands, and private lands. The Resource Development Council for Alaska breaks this information down in their newsletter, “Who Owns Alaska and Why Does It Matter?”
  8. Big Game Locking Tags - All nonresident hunters must obtain the appropriate locking tags when hunting big game in Alaska. Muskox and brown/grizzly bears also require locking tags even for residents, so it is crucial to plan accordingly.
This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

URGENT: Do You Support Obama's Plans for Stricter Gun Control? Vote Now

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Hunting in Alaska takes careful planning and attention to detail. There are many regulations and other factors to consider when devising an expedition there.
hunting, Alaska, information, permit
647
2015-13-21
Thursday, 21 May 2015 11:13 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved