Tags: hidden | symptoms | heart attack

Hidden Symptoms of Heart Attack

By    |   Sunday, 19 Oct 2014 01:33 PM

Most people assume the symptoms of a heart attack will be easy to identify — a sudden pain in the chest that demands a call to 911. While chest pain is the most common symptom of heart attack for both men and women, there are hidden symptoms many fail to recognize.

Experts at the American Heart Association maintain that heart attacks often have very different onset of symptoms than the "movie heart attack" experience many people expect. According to web-based information provided by the organization, people often wait too long to get treatment.

Urgent: Discover your risk for heart disease, take the test now!

One study, published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing (2010), explains that while heart disease death rates are going down, some people are still delaying treatment, a move that could cost them their lives. Among the many reasons for delayed treatment is the lack of symptom recognition. People are not expecting their heart attacks to look or feel the way they do. Sixty-three percent of people studied, who had heart attacks, did not even mention chest pain as their reason for seeking emergency treatment.

Here are some hidden symptoms of heart attacks that those at high risk should know, courtesy of the AHA:

1. Shortness of breath: A heart attack may make you feel suddenly like you’ve been running a marathon, even though you’ve done no particularly strenuous physical activity.

2. The pain may come and go: People may miss the sign they are having a heart attack because the pain is not consistent. Heart attack pain may go and come back ebbing and flowing over several minutes.

3. Heart attack symptoms can mimic the flu: a cold sweat, nausea, and lightheadedness are all symptoms that can be associated with a heart attack, particularly in women.

4. A heart attack may feel more like pressure than pain: Even if it feels more like an uncomfortable pressure or squeezing than strong pain, you may be having a heart attack.

5. The pain may not just be in your chest: Heart attack pain can extend or be felt in the arms, neck, back, jaw, or stomach.

Doctors advise that minutes matter. The best survival chance for a heart attack is to call 911 within five minutes of the onset of symptoms.

It is important to note that, while more men have heart attacks, more women die from them, in part because women’s symptoms are harder to clearly identify. Women are also not as likely to expect a heart attack. As a result, many women do not get the prompt treatment they need. Heart disease is the number one killer of women.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute offers an online tool to help patients assess their personal 10-year risk for a heart attack. 

This article is for information only and is not intended as medical advice. Talk with your doctor about your specific health and medical needs.

Urgent: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Most people assume the symptoms of a heart attack will be easy to identify — a sudden pain in the chest that demands a call to 911. While chest pain is the most common symptom of heart attack for both men and women, there are hidden symptoms many fail to recognize.
hidden, symptoms, heart attack
500
2014-33-19
Sunday, 19 Oct 2014 01:33 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved