Tags: green tea | concentrate

Green Tea Concentrate: 7 Ways Healers Use It

By    |   Tuesday, 21 Oct 2014 03:13 PM

Green tea, common in China and Japan, has become increasingly popular in the United States, as experts continue examining the potential health benefits of green tea concentrate.

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Green tea contains antioxidants called polyphenols, which fight free radicals that contribute to the aging process and ailments such as cancer and heart disease, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

Green tea can be found in numerous forms, including as a drink, an ointment, a pill, or a liquid extract. The effectiveness of green tea as a health supplement remains uncertain, but it has a variety of potential health benefits, including antiviral effects, blood thinning properties, improving cardiovascular health, slowing mental decline, enhancing weight loss, arthritis protection, and protecting the skin, according to Dr. Ray Sahelian, a physician and medical writer who regularly discusses the benefits and risks of natural supplements.

A green tea extract ointment is likely effective for the treatment of genital warts, according to the National Institutes of Health’s U.S. National Library of Medicine. The Food and Drug Administration has approved a specific green tea ointment for such use.

Green tea is possibly effective for preventing dizziness upon standing; preventing bladder, esophageal, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers; reducing the risk of Parkinson’s disease; and decreasing cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood.

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Oral use of green tea extracts has been used to treat borderline diabetes, according to NYU Langone Medical Center.

While green tea is likely safe for most adults, there are some concerns about its overuse. The most common concern about the use of green tea in drink form is the presence of caffeine. Green tea extracts may carry more significant concerns, including being associated with liver inflammation, the NYU Langone Medical Center has also found.

The possibility of negative interactions with medications and food is another concern. Green tea may inhibit the absorption of iron and promote iron deficiency, according to the University of Michigan Health System.

It also may interfere with the benefits of folic acid.

Because of these concerns associated with green tea extract, Sahelian recommends taking no more than one pill three times a week.

This article is for information only and is not intended as medical advice. Talk with your doctor about your specific health and medical needs.

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Green tea, common in China and Japan, has become increasingly popular in the United States, as experts continue examining the potential health benefits of green tea concentrate.
green tea, concentrate
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2014-13-21
Tuesday, 21 Oct 2014 03:13 PM
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