Tags: Gun Control | US State Facts | fishing | New Mexico | invasive species

Fishing in New Mexico: 3 Invasive Aquatic Species to New Mexico and Its Rules for Catching Them

By    |   Wednesday, 09 Mar 2016 04:54 PM

Several invasive aquatic species populate the waterways of New Mexico. When fishing in the Land of Enchantment, angers should know these species and the rules for catching them.

1. Rusty Crayfish

The New Mexico Department of Fish and Game has been keeping an eye on the rusty crayfish, and mentioned it in a 2009 invasive species report. According to the Eat The Invaders website, these crayfish eat tadpoles and bass and trout eggs. They also eat plants that line the bottoms of lakes and streams, which can create stream-bank erosion and can make bodies of water cloudier.

The New Mexico Department Fish and Game doesn’t have any specific rules for catching this invasive species. There aren’t any catch or possession limits. Rusty crayfish can be found in permanent lakes and streams, and are considered invasive because they are displacing native crayfish populations, as well as breeding with native species.

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2. Tiger Muskies

A usually sterile and carnivorous fish, the tiger muskellunge is a hybrid of true muskellunge and northern pike. The New Mexico Department of Fish and Game introduced this predator to primarily control other invasive species such as goldfish and white suckers. According to the Solitary Angler, the department introduced the tiger muskies to the Bluewater and Quemado lakes in 2003. In addition to eating the goldfish and white suckers, tiger muskies also eat small birds. According to the New Mexico Department of Fish and Game, anglers can only catch one tiger muskie a day and it must be 40 inches or longer.

3. Blue Catfish

Blue catfish are native to New Mexico because they travel along the Rio Grande River. However, they are considered an invasive species in other areas of the United States, and even parts of the Land of Enchantment. They can be found in the Cape Fear, Catawba, Neuse, and Yadkin drainages, according to the United States Geological Survey. They were introduced to many areas because of sport fishing. They can live up to 20 years and grow to be 100 pounds.

According to the New Mexico Department of Fish and Game, the catch limit for all catfish species, except bullheads, is 15 per day, unless fishing in the Animas River and San Juan River in San Juan County, then there are no bag or possession limits.

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Several invasive aquatic species populate the waterways of New Mexico. When fishing in the Land of Enchantment, angers should know these species and the rules for catching them.
fishing, New Mexico, invasive species
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2016-54-09
Wednesday, 09 Mar 2016 04:54 PM
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