Tags: US State Facts | facts about cheyenne | wyoming

5 Facts About Wyoming's Capital: How Well Do You Know Cheyenne?

By    |   Thursday, 07 May 2015 12:59 PM

When people think of Cheyenne, Wyoming it's likely that images of windy plains and strong, silent cowboys come to mind. That's true as far as it goes, but there are many more facts about Cheyenne than remnants of the Wild West days.

For one, it's the capital city of a state nearly half of which is owned by the federal government, whose most profitable industry is coal mining, not cattle, and where government services provide 20 percent of the jobs.

VOTE NOW: Is Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead Doing a Good Job?

Here are a few facts about Cheyenne that might belie the city's sagebrush:

1. The Submarine: This dry and deeply-inland city has a US Navy SSN-773 submarine named after it. The city petitioned the Navy Department in 1989 to name a Los Angeles class submarine after Cheyenne, noting that there had been a Navy ship honoring Wyoming's capital in the late 1800s, but that its name had been changed to the USS Wyoming. The submersible Cheyenne was commissioned in 1996, and is still in active service in Hawaii.

2. Diversity in Horticulture: The Cheyenne Botanic Gardens include much that one would expect in this windswept state: a cactus garden, a rock garden, and a xeriscape, as well as the more typical rose garden and flower gardens. But it also features three "plazas" showcasing plants and events of the 1700s, 1800s, and 1900s, and includes an old steam locomotive and an antique tractor. Two community gardens allow volunteers to grow their own food, with the surplus donated to senior citizens.

3. Federal Domain: The federal government owns over 42 percent of the land in the Cowboy State. Don't panic, though: Our Public Lands, an organization serving hunters, fishermen, and other outdoors enthusiasts, points out, "These public lands include national parks, forests, wildlife refuges, monuments, wilderness areas and lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management," and are actually invaluable in a state that is striving to boost tourism.

VOTE NOW: Should the Government Be Doing More to Promote Tourism in America?

4. Sister Cities: Cheyenne's city website extols its participation in the Sister Cities program, noting that the term refers to "cities that have similar cultures and/or historical backgrounds." In Cheyenne's case, that includes not only Bismarck (North Dakota), but Pacific Coast village Lompoc (California), Taichung (Taiwan), Lourdes (France), Voghera (Italy), Hammam Sousse (Tunisia), and Waimea (Hawaii).

5. Magic City of the Plains:
Cheyenne was once nicknamed "The Magic City of the Plains," not because it made anyone disappear, but because it grew so fast after its establishment as a supply depot for the Union Pacific railroad. According to City-Data.com, it was founded in August of 1867, and by the end of the year had seen its population increase from 600 to 4,000 people.

In those wild times, its founder once said (whether with affection or dismay it is not known) that it was the "gambling capital of the world; it practiced gun control, requiring visitors to check their firearms upon entry.

URGENT: Do You Approve of the Job Matt Mead Is Doing as Wyoming Governor?

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
When people think of Cheyenne, Wyoming it's likely that images of windy plains and strong, silent cowboys come to mind. That's true as far as it goes, but there are many more facts about Cheyenne than remnants of the Wild West days.
facts about cheyenne, wyoming
519
2015-59-07
Thursday, 07 May 2015 12:59 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved