Tags: Presidential History | dwight eisenhower | peacetime | address | quotes | speech

Dwight Eisenhower Peacetime Address Highlights: 9 Quotes From Speech

By    |   Monday, 01 Jun 2015 02:31 PM

Although it wasn’t long after Dwight Eisenhower entered the presidential office that he signed a settlement to end the Korean War, he also held office during the Cold War, which meant his opportunities for a peacetime speech were few and far between.

However, he did give a powerful address called The Chance For Peace on April 16, 1953 that sought to empower Americans to stand their ground for global freedoms, according to History.com.

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Here are nine highlights from the influential speech:

1. “In this spring of 1953 the free world weighs one question above all others: the chances for a just peace for all peoples. To weigh this chance is to summon instantly to mind another recent moment of great decision. It came with that yet more hopeful spring of 1945, bright with the promise of victory and of freedom. The hopes of all just men in that moment too was a just and lasting peace.”

2. “The way chosen by the United States was plainly marked by a few clear precepts, which govern its conduct in world affairs. First: No people on earth can be held, as a people, to be an enemy, for all humanity shares the common hunger for peace and fellowship and justice. Second: No nation's security and well-being can be lastingly achieved in isolation but only in effective cooperation with fellow-nations. Third: Every nation's right to a form of government and an economic system of its own choosing is inalienable. Fourth: Any nation's attempt to dictate to other nations their form of government is indefensible. And fifth: A nation's hope of lasting peace cannot be firmly based upon any race in armaments but rather upon just relations and honest understanding with all other nations.”

3. “The Soviet government held a vastly different vision of the future. In the world of its design, security was to be found, not in mutual trust and mutual aid but in force: huge armies, subversion, rule of neighbor nations. The goal was power superiority at all cost. Security was to be sought by denying it to all others.”

4.
“There remained, however, one thing essentially unchanged and unaffected by Soviet conduct. This unchanged thing was the readiness of the free world to welcome sincerely any genuine evidence of peaceful purpose enabling all peoples again to resume their common quest of just peace. And the free world still holds to that purpose.”

5. “What can the world, or any nation in it, hope for if no turning is found on this dread road? The worst to be feared and the best to be expected can be simply stated. The worst is atomic war.”

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6. “The free world knows, out of the bitter wisdom of experience, that vigilance and sacrifice are the price of liberty.”

7. “We are ready not only to press forward with the present plans for closer unity of the nations of Western Europe but also, upon that foundation, to strive to foster a broader European community, conducive to the free movement of persons, of trade, and of ideas.”

8. “The peace we seek, founded upon decent trust and cooperative effort among nations, can be fortified, not by weapons of war but by wheat and by cotton, by milk and by wool, by meat and timber and rice. These are words that translate into every language on earth. These are the needs that challenge this world in arms.”

9. “The purpose of the United States, in stating these proposals, is simple. These proposals spring, without ulterior motive or political passion, from our calm conviction that the hunger for peace is in the hearts of all people — those of Russia and of China no less than of our own country. They conform to our firm faith that God created man to enjoy, not destroy, the fruits of the earth and of their own toil. They aspire to this: the lifting, from the backs and from the hearts of men, of their burden of arms and of fears, so that they may find before them a golden age of freedom and of peace.”

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Although it wasn't long after Dwight Eisenhower entered the presidential office that he signed a settlement to end the Korean War, he also held office during the Cold War, which meant his opportunities for a peacetime speech were few and far between.
dwight eisenhower, peacetime, address, quotes, speech
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Monday, 01 Jun 2015 02:31 PM
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