Tags: Health Topics | disneyland | measles | outbreak

2 Fictions About Measles Outbreak at Disneyland

By    |   Tuesday, 02 Jun 2015 09:39 AM

From December 2014 – April 2015, 131 Californians contracted measles – a highly contagious disease characterized by fevers, rashes, and pink eye – from an outbreak that originated in Disneyland and spread to 147 people throughout the U.S.

As the virus spread and Disneyland visitors were tracked down, examined, and quarantined, a myriad of rumors regarding the decades-old vaccination, immunization, and “conspiracy theories” debates flourished throughout the country.

VOTE NOW: Should Parents Have the Freedom Not to Vaccinate Their Children?

Here are the two major myths pertaining to the measles outbreak at Disneyland:

1. The vaccinations given to Disneyland visitors prior to their vacations sickened the victims

Some opponents of vaccination believe that vaccines actually cause patients to contract the virus instead of immunizing them from that virus. However, the oral polio vaccine is the only known vaccine that caused the illness it sought to prevent, and it is no longer in use, The Washington Times reports.

Although human immune systems sometimes react to vaccines with mild symptoms that may mimic the illness’s symptoms, the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) has never been proven to cause the disease itself.

URGENT: Should the Government Be Allowed to Mandate Vaccinations?

2. Illegal immigrants brought the measles to Disneyland

Although the original contractor of the measles virus at Disneyland is still unknown, measles is primarily spread through what is known as “low levels of herd immunity.” Forbes notes that within an unvaccinated population, one person infected with measles will spread the disease to 12-18 other people.

In California, as well as throughout the U.S., many families refuse the vaccination for personal or religious reasons. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), only about 91 percent of U.S. children are vaccinated or not fully vaccinated with the two recommended doses, thus making the community spread of measles much more viable, no matter the original source.

Furthermore, in 2013, the CDC (Centers for Disease Control) tracked measles cases
and reported that half of the measles importation into the U.S. came from unvaccinated U.S. residents returning from foreign travel.

The resulting evidence does not support blaming undocumented immigrants for measles outbreaks in the U.S.

VOTE NOW: Should Vaccinations for Children Be the Parents' Decision?

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From December 2014 - April 2015, 131 Californians contracted measles - a highly contagious disease characterized by fevers, rashes, and pink eye - from an outbreak that originated in Disneyland and spread to 147 people throughout the U.S.
disneyland, measles, outbreak
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2015-39-02
Tuesday, 02 Jun 2015 09:39 AM
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