Tags: Global Warming | cars | global warming | trucks | fuel-efficient

Cars and Global Warming: Where Did All the Fuel-Efficient Small Trucks Go?

By    |   Sunday, 22 Mar 2015 09:03 AM

Environmental concerns and the desire for fuel-efficient cars to reduce gas costs led consumers who wanted pickups to seek small trucks. As global warming issues came to the forefront, automakers developed ways to make their bigger trucks fuel-efficient.

There are several reasons why consumers prefer full-sized trucks to small trucks. First, a person looking for a truck might want to get a “real truck,” according to some observers. Trucks that have more powerful engines and large room in the bed just seem like the ideal vehicle for a truck lover. Plus, bigger trucks have more room for people and even pets.

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Some smaller, fuel-efficient trucks still remain popular. The Toyota Tacoma has remained a big seller over the years, but that might be because of owner loyalty and the reputation the vehicle has for quality and durability.

Improved technologies to make cars and trucks more eco-friendly have actually led to advances in the way the vehicles operate. Manufacturers are able to build bigger trucks that provide motorists with great mileage.

At the beginning of the 21st century, full-sized trucks could usually only get about 15 miles per gallon on the highway. However, automakers increased their competition with each other amid continued environmental regulations to build bigger, better models with fuel-efficient capabilities.

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The result has been Ford, Chrysler, Chevrolet and other companies producing full-sized trucks that get 25 to 28 miles per gallon and approaching 30 miles per gallon, doubling the fuel efficiency while giving car buyers the opportunity to enjoy big-sized pickup trucks.

Ironically, government regulations resulting from global warming concerns led to innovative techniques by car manufacturers. At the same time, they improved vehicle performance to reduce harmful emissions into the environment.

Compact pickups from General Motors and Ford were popular a decade ago as they achieved industry standards for fuel economy. Consumers were also willing to buy smaller trucks because they didn’t think they needed a bigger truck. However, that changed as the fuel efficiency improved.

The competition revved up when Ford began manufacturing V-6 pickups that could get 23 miles per gallon in 2010. Chrysler came along in 2013 with its V-6 Ram 1500 at 25 miles per gallon. Chrysler followed up with the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel that achieves 28 miles per gallon with an EPA certification. The competition then became a battle among car companies to reach 30 miles per gallon as innovations continue to improve on full-sized trucks.

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Environmental concerns and the desire for fuel-efficient cars to reduce gas costs led consumers who wanted pickups to seek small trucks. As global warming issues came to the forefront, automakers developed ways to make their bigger trucks fuel-efficient.
cars, global warming, trucks, fuel-efficient
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2015-03-22
Sunday, 22 Mar 2015 09:03 AM
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