Tags: Arthritis | arthritis | joint pain | acetaminophen

Acetaminophen for Arthritis: Side Effects You Need to Know

By    |   Wednesday, 12 Aug 2015 05:26 PM

Acetaminophen is found in prescription medicine and over-the-counter medications, such as Tylenol and Excedrin. Arthritis sufferers use it as a pain reliever, but there are some possible side effects.

Acetaminophen doesn’t usually cause stomach disorders or related problems as with aspirin, but too much acetaminophen increases the risk of liver damage, according to the Arthritis Foundation.

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Taking prescription medication and over-the-counter products can increase a person’s intake of acetaminophen without knowing it. The drug may be combined with other drugs in cough and cold medicines and prescription pain relievers, the Arthritis Foundation noted.

The Food and Drug Administration requested that manufacturers limit combination prescription medicine to no more than 325 mg of acetaminophen and asked doctors to stop prescribing medication with more than 325 mg of the drug per dose. The idea is to reduce the risk of overdosing on the drug through tablets, capsules or other dosage products.

When used properly, acetaminophen side effects aren’t common, according to MedicineNet.com. Large doses, chronic use or using in combination with alcohol can damage the liver. Other side effects may include hypersensitive reactions and skin reactions.

According to DailyMed, a website for the National Library of Medicine, acetaminophen arthritis pain caplets with extended release contain 650 mg acetaminophen per caplet.

The warning label on the product warns of severe liver damage from taking more than six caplets in 24 hours, combining the medicine with other drugs containing acetaminophen, or drinking more than three alcoholic drinks a day while using the product.

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Skin reactions may include skin reddening, blisters and rash.

When taking acetaminophen for arthritis, the Arthritis Foundation recommends that people discuss all the medications they are taking with their doctor or pharmacist. Doctors will know not to prescribe patients with acetaminophen when they are taking other-the-counter or prescription products with the drug to avoid overdosing.

It’s also important for people to monitor their medicine themselves, such as reading labels of medication in case the product contains acetaminophen, so they won’t overdose and risk damaging the liver.

The Arthritis Foundation also advises those taking acetaminophen for arthritis to take the smallest possible dose, only increasing it for more pain relief, and limiting or avoiding alcohol. Acetaminophen is safe and effective when taken properly.

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Acetaminophen is found in prescription medicine and over-the-counter medications, such as Tylenol and Excedrin. Arthritis sufferers use it as a pain reliever, but there are some possible side effects.
arthritis, joint pain, acetaminophen
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2015-26-12
Wednesday, 12 Aug 2015 05:26 PM
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