Tags: Vaccines | andrew wakefield | vaccination | skeptic

Andrew Wakefield Wasn't the First Vaccination Skeptic

By    |   Monday, 27 Jul 2015 05:59 PM

Andrew Wakefield released a report demonstrating a link between autism and vaccinations in the 1990s, but he was not the first to express uneasiness over immunizations.

In fact, The Bismark Tribune traces skepticism of vaccinations almost back to when they were first created.

During the mid-1800s, the cowpox virus was used in order immunize people from contracting smallpox. Many people avoided the use, however, because they were afraid it would turn them into cows.

During the late 19th century and early 20th century, sentiment in opposition to vaccinations peaked due to unregulated injections that at times were ineffective or could cause infections do to improper sterilization.

By the 1950s, the country had switched sides as the polio epidemic caused 15,000 cases of paralysis every year, the newspaper reported. In 1955, a vaccination for the disease was released.

URGENT: Should States Be Allowed to Make Health Decisions for Your Children?

Additionally, the German outbreak of measles in the early 1960s led to many miscarriages and infant deaths, but a vaccination was developed in 1969 that has mostly eradicated the illness.

Resurgence of inoculation fears occurred in the 1990s when Wakefield released his study in The Lancet linking the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination to autism.

Later, conflicts of interest would be revealed in connection to Wakefield causing his study to become discredited, according to The Washington Post.

This would eventually lead to Wakefield’s study being retracted by the journal and the doctor’s medical license being revoked.

While numerous studies since have demonstrated a lack of a connection between autism and shots, many remain insistent in exempting their children from receiving the injections and promoting others to do so as well.

With memories of diseases like polio and measles fading, there has been push to remove exemptions available to parents to opt out of the required immunizations. This includes even religious reasons, such as those suggested earlier this year in North Carolina, initiated following the measles outbreak in Disneyland last year, WRAL reported.

For some, medical exemptions from immunizations remain important to the individual’s health.

According to KXNews, Dax Hjelmstad in North Dakota had seizures within two days after receiving his first dose of the MMR vaccination five years ago. The seizures lasted up to one hour, and doctors had to revive the boy three times.

His mom decided to no longer give her son vaccinations and the doctor agreed, according to the television station. Hjelmstad has been free of seizures for the past three years.

VOTE NOW: Should Parents Have the Freedom Not to Vaccinate Their Children?

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Andrew Wakefield released a report demonstrating a link between autism and vaccinations in the 1990s, but he was not the first to express uneasiness over immunizations. In fact, skepticism of vaccinations can be traced almost back to when they were first created.
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2015-59-27
Monday, 27 Jul 2015 05:59 PM
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