Tags: Gun Control | ammunition defects | ammo

How to Spot Defects in Your Ammo

By    |   Wednesday, 03 Jun 2015 09:41 AM

Most shooters regularly inspect their firearms during both the shooting and cleaning process and can easily spot defects in a firearm they handle on a regular basis.

But its less common to closely inspect every round from every box of ammo that you shoot recreationally. Unless you shoot a lot of reloaded ammunition, defective ammunition is, thankfully, quite rare.

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However, a “bad apple” can occasionally sneak in, and you should know what to look for. It is not necessary to be overly obsessed with your ammo, but you should pay close enough attention when loading your firearm that you notice something that doesn’t look or feel as you would expect it to.

Hopefully, you will see or feel a damaged case prior to loading it into your firearm. In a situation like this (rare) the case may be bent unusually or deformed.

If you don’t notice it when picking it up, it may seat unusually in your magazine. In the worst case scenario, you may unknowingly attempt to fire it which could result in damage to your gun, or worse, to you.

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If you shoot on a regular basis and rotate your ammo out as you use it, you shouldn’t have an issue with corrosion, but it can still happen, especially if you live in an extreme climate with a lot of moisture, or do not store your ammo in a climate controlled area or safe.

This is precisely why they sell moisture absorbing products (desiccants), and even specially made dehumidifiers made for gun safes.

While not visible upon inspection, too low or too high of a powder charge can result in either a dangerous squib load (the bullet gets lodged in the barrel) or damage to both the firearm and the shooter.

Powder charge discrepancies are extremely rare and usually only seen when using ammo from inexperienced or careless reloaders. Many firearm manufacturers strongly recommend not shooting reloaded ammunition for this reason.

This article does not constitute legal advice. Check the current gun laws before purchasing or traveling with a firearm.

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Most shooters regularly inspect their firearms during both the shooting and cleaning process and can easily spot defects in a firearm they handle on a regular basis.
ammunition defects, ammo
376
2015-41-03
Wednesday, 03 Jun 2015 09:41 AM
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