Tags: Iran | Middle East | Saudi | Nuclear | Capability | Iran

Zero Chance of Saudi Nuclear Capability

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Friday, 12 Jun 2015 11:28 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Of the many unnerving aspects of the future of the Middle East, a nuclear arms race would top the list. And it is to feed that unease that Saudi Arabia has been periodically dropping hints that, if Iran's nuclear ambitions go unchecked, it might just have to get nuclear weapons itself.

Last week, the Saudi ambassador to London made yet another explicit threat, warning that "all options will be on the table."

Oh, please! Saudi Arabia isn't going to build a nuclear weapon. Saudi Arabia can't build a nuclear weapon. Saudi Arabia hasn't even built a car. (By 2017, after much effort, the country is expected to manufacture its first automobile.)

Saudi Arabia can dig holes in the ground and pump out oil but little else. Oil revenue is about 45 percent of its GDP, a staggeringly high figure, much larger than petro-states like Nigeria and Venezuela. It makes up almost 90 percent of the Saudi government's revenues. Despite decades of massive government investment, lavish subsidies, and cheap energy, manufacturing is less than 10 percent of Saudi GDP.

Where would Saudi Arabia train the scientists to work on its secret program? The country's education system is backward and dysfunctional, having been largely handed over to its puritanical and reactionary religious establishment. The country ranks 73rd in the quality of its math and science education, according to the World Economic Forum — abysmally low for a rich country. Iran, despite 36 years of sanctions and a much lower per capita GDP, fares far better at 44.

And who would work in Saudi Arabia's imagined nuclear industry? In a penetrating book, Karen Elliott House, formerly of The Wall Street Journal, describes the Saudi labor market: "One of every three people in Saudi Arabia is a foreigner. Two out of every three people with a job of any sort are foreign. And in Saudi Arabia's anemic private sector, fully nine out of 10 people holding jobs are non-Saudi.

"Saudi Arabia, in short, is a society in which all too many men do not want to work at jobs for which they are qualified; in which women by and large aren't allowed to work; and in which, as a result, most of the work is done by foreigners."

None of this is to suggest that the kingdom is in danger of collapse. Far from it. The regime's finances are strong, though public spending keeps rising and oil revenues have been declining. The royal family has deftly used patronage, politics, religion, and repression to keep the country stable and quiescent. But that has produced a system of stagnation for most, with a gilded elite surfing on top with almost unimaginable sums of money.

Saudi Arabia's increased assertiveness has been portrayed as strategic. In fact, it is a panicked and emotional response to Iran, fueled in no small measure by long-standing anti-Shiite bigotry. It is pique masquerading as strategy. In October 2013, after having spent years and millions of dollars campaigning for a seat on the U.N. Security Council, it abruptly declined the post at the last minute, signaling that it was annoyed at U.S. policy in its region.

Its most recent international activism, the air campaign in Yemen, has badly backfired. Bruce Riedel, a former top White House aide, says that damage to civilians and physical infrastructure "has created considerable bad blood between Yemenis and their rich Gulf neighbors that will poison relations for years. Yemenis always resented their rich brothers; now many will want revenge."

He notes that the air campaign is being directed by the new minister of defense, the king's 29-year-old son, who has no experience in military affairs, or much else.

But couldn't Saudi Arabia simply buy a nuclear bomb? That's highly unlikely. Any such effort would have to take place secretly, under the threat of sanctions, Western retaliation, and interception. Saudi Arabia is heavily dependent on foreigners and their firms to help with its energy industry, build its infrastructure, buy its oil, and sell it goods and services. Were it isolated like Iran or North Korea, its entire economic system would collapse.

It is often claimed that Pakistan would sell nukes to the Saudis. And it's true that the Saudis have bailed out Pakistan many times. But the government in Islamabad is well aware that such a deal could make it a pariah and face sanctions itself. It is unlikely to risk that, even to please its sugar daddy in Riyadh. In April, Pakistan refused repeated Saudi pleas to join the air campaign in Yemen.

So let me make a prediction: Whatever happens with Iran's nuclear program, 10 years from now Saudi Arabia won't have nuclear weapons. Because it can't.

Fareed Zakaria hosts CNN's "Fareed Zakaria GPS," and makes regular appearances on shows such as ABC’s "This Week" and NBC's "Meet the Press." He has been editor at large at Time magazine since 2010, and spent 10 years overseeing Newsweek's foreign editions. He is a Washington Post (and internationally syndicated) columnist. He is author of "The Post-American World." For more of Fareed Zakaria's reports, Go Here Now.







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Of the many unnerving aspects of the future of the Middle East, a nuclear arms race tops the list. And it is to feed that unease that Saudi Arabia periodically drops hints that, if Iran's nuclear ambitions go unchecked, it might just have to get nuclear weapons itself.
Saudi, Nuclear, Capability, Iran
846
2015-28-12
Friday, 12 Jun 2015 11:28 AM
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