Tags: states | rights | missouri | guns

Missouri Makes Big States' Rights Push

By Greg Richter   |   Sunday, 26 Jan 2014 08:04 PM

Undaunted by a 2013 effort to nullify federal gun laws, a group of Missouri legislators are launching a wider effort to push for states' rights by attempting nullify several federal laws in the state.

USA Today reports that among the proposals in the Missouri General Assembly is a Committee on the Tenth Amendment. That panel would keep an eye out for federal legislation that infringes on Missouri's sovereignty.

The 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution says that all powers not given to the federal government or prohibited to the states lie with the states or with the people. The Missiouri lawmakers are basing their actions on the amendment.

One senator wants voters to decide on abolishing federal laws legalizing same-sex marriage, abortion, and more, USA Today reports. And another bill would exempt products made in Missouri that don't leave the state from interstate commerce laws. All such products would have to be stamped, "Made in Missiouri."

The group modeled its 10th Amendment bill on a model bill by the Tenth Amendment Center, which seeks to nullify what it considers intrusive federal laws.

"It does not negate anything that we currently have on the books, nor does it negate anything that we can do as a state. Meaning, if we feel that the federal government is doing their job and we like their rules, those rules will apply," Rep. Chrissy Sommer, R-St. Charles, told USA Today.

Self-described political scientist John Davidson warned lawmakers against the bill at a public hearing, saying they are not considering the consequences. Since current Missouri law outlaws machine guns and sawed-off shotguns, he said, they would become legal under the "Made in Missouri" law so long and the guns were made in the state and were also bought there.

Separately, the Missouri Senate began hearings last week on a bill similar to one vetoed last year that would make it a crime for federal agents to enforce gun laws in the state, reports The Washington Post.  The bill calls for jailing violators  for up to a year and fining them as much as $1,000. It also would allow some school officials to carry concealed weapons, even where local laws prohibit concealed carry.

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