Pain Relievers Do Not Prevent Alzheimer's — Study

Wednesday, 22 Apr 2009 10:30 PM

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink

WASHINGTON — Anti-inflammatory pain relievers such as Ibupofren (Advil, Motril) and naproxen (Aleve) may delay the onset of Alzheimer's but do not prevent it, according to a new medical study.

Earlier studies indicated that such nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which include aspirin, could protect against Alzheimer's, a degenerative disease linked to inflammation in the brain.

The new research, published in the April 22 online issue of Neurology, the journal of the American Academy of Neurology, has shown the opposite effect, with NSAIDs increasing the risk of Alzheimer's by 66 percent.

The study involved 2,736 subjects with an average age of 75 who did not suffer dementia when enrolled. Followed over a period of 12 years, the group included 351 heavy users of ibuprofen or naproxen prior to enrollment, and 107 who became heavy users during the study.

At the end of the research, 476 patients had developed Alzheimer's or some form of dementia.

Researchers determined that heavy NSAIDs users had 66 percent greater chance of developing Alzheimer's or dementia than those with little or no NSAID use.

"A key difference between this study and most of those done earlier is that our participants were older," said study author John Breitner, of the Department of Veterans Affairs and the University of Washington in Seattle.

"It has been argued for some time that NSAID use delays the onset of Alzheimer's disease. It would follow that studies looking at younger people who use NSAIDs would show fewer cases of Alzheimer's, while in groups of older people there might be more cases, including those that would have occurred earlier if they had not been delayed," he added.

"This is one interpretation of the results, but other explanations are possible," Breitner cautioned, adding that further research was needed to understand why NSAIDs increased the risk of dementia.

Copyright © 2009 AFP. All rights reserved.

-

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

Vikings Bring Back Peterson Despite Child Abuse Charge

Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 06:57 AM

Adrian Peterson was back at Minnesota Vikings headquarters on Monday, and the first thing fullback Jerome Felton did whe . . .

Rutgers Professor: Guest Workers Are Stealing High-Tech Jobs

Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 06:51 AM

Will borrowed workers make up the workforce of the future in the United States? One sociologist and professor is suggest . . .

Northern California Wildfire Burns 100 Homes

Monday, 15 Sep 2014 22:38 PM

A fire driven by fierce winds raced through the small town of Weed, Calif., near the Oregon border on Monday, burning a  . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved