Tags: doctors | retire | early

Report: More Doctors Plan to Retire Early

Saturday, 23 Mar 2013 11:23 AM

By Matthew Auerbach

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
A majority of physicians see a somewhat bleak future for medicine, pointing to eroding independence and shrinking income, reports everydayhealth.com.

According to a survey from the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions of more than 600 doctors, six in 10 physicians said they expect many of their colleagues to retire earlier than planned in the next 1 to 3 years.

That perception cuts across age, gender and specialty.

Another 55 percent of doctors surveyed believe many of their colleagues will cut back on their hours because of the way medicine is changing, although the survey didn't delineate on how it was changing.

Seventy-five percent believe the best and brightest may not consider a career in medicine, an increase from the 2011 survey result of 69 percent.

“Physicians recognize ‘the new normal’ will necessitate major changes in the profession that require them to practice in different settings as part of a larger organization that uses technologies and team-based models for consumer (patient) care,” the survey's findings stated.

Approximately two-thirds of those surveyed said they believe physicians and hospitals will work together more closely in coming years.

Results found that in the last 2 years, 31 percent moved into a larger practice.

Nearly eight in 10 believe midlevel providers will play a larger role in directing primary care.

Four in 10 doctors reported their take-home pay decreased from 2011 to 2012, with more than half said their pay cut was 10 percent or less, according to the survey.

Among physicians reporting a pay cut, four in 10 blame Obamacare and 48 percent of all doctors believed their income would drop again in 2013 as a result of the health reform law.

It wasn’t all bad news, however.

Seventy percent of doctors said they were satisfied about practicing medicine, although that number was lower for primary care providers and higher for younger age groups.

Dissatisfaction was blamed on less one-on-one time with patients, longer hours, and dealing with Medicare, Medicaid, and government regulations.

Deloitte mailed the survey to more than 20,000 physicians selected from the American Medical Association's master file. Just 613 returned completed surveys, giving a margin of error of 3.9 percent at the 0.95 confidence level.



© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

House Panel to Meet With Safety Regulators on Takata Air Bags

Friday, 24 Oct 2014 12:44 PM

The U.S. House committee looking into the defective air bags made by Japanese supplier Takata Corp will hold an initial  . . .

Disputed Oklahoma Ten Commandments Statue Smashed

Friday, 24 Oct 2014 12:02 PM

Authorities say someone drove across the Oklahoma Capitol lawn and knocked over a Ten Commandments monument that a group . . .

'Honey Boo Boo' Axed After Reports Mother Dating Sex Offender

Friday, 24 Oct 2014 11:59 AM

US reality TV channel TLC said Friday it's pulling the plug on Here Comes Honey Boo Boo amid reports that one of its a . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved