Tags: cow | thief | arrested | drones

Cow Thief Becomes First Arrest Using Drones

Wednesday, 29 Jan 2014 07:42 AM

By Elliot Jager

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Local North Dakota authorities were aided by live video surveillance from a U.S. Border Patrol Predator drone in an armed standoff with a farmer and three of his sons involving a neighbor's straying cows,  Betabeat reported.

Rodney Brossart, who runs a profitable farm on 3,600 acres, and can sometimes be "disagreeable," had refused to return the cows that had wandered onto his property in June 2011,  The Grand Forks Herald reported.

The farmer and his sons engaged in an armed standoff with sheriffs deputies who called in a SWAT team. With the help of the drone, the fugitives were located and arrested on their farm.

In sentencing Brossart this week to 90 days in jail— along with other penalties— Judge Joel Medd of the Northeast Central Judicial District said, "This case should have never happened.
Chalk it up to stubbornness, to stupidity, to being at odds with your neighbors or any combination of those. We should never have been here if the cows would have just been returned."

Brossart initially sought to get the case dismissed because authorities had no warrant for the drone surveillance. Judge Medd rejected the motion because the drone "appears to have had no bearing on these charges being contested here,"  according court papers.

The farmer promised he'd behave differently in the future. "Sometimes things don't make sense. ... And we do things that we wish we had done differently," he said according to the Herald.

As part of a plea bargain, the sons, Thomas, Alex and Jacob, pleaded guilty to menacing law enforcement officers, a misdemeanor. The brothers were put on probation.

Meanwhile, Michael Peck writing in Forbes pointed out that the issue of aerial surveillance, whether by helicopter or drone, "is ambiguous, with some court rulings— including a 1986 Supreme Court decision— allowing warrantless surveillance, while other rulings have found it to be unconstitutional."

When suspected criminals are tracked by police drones, Peck writes, the privacy of ordinary civilians may be compromised in the process.

Related Stories





© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Retype Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

Expert: Use Complex Passwords to Protect Accounts

Tuesday, 02 Sep 2014 13:09 PM

One primary method to protect Internet cloud accounts from hackers is to use "complex" passwords, a cyber security exper . . .

St. Louis Mayor Welcomes Immigrants, Talks Diversity After Ferguson

Tuesday, 02 Sep 2014 12:21 PM

As rancor over young immigrants from Central America rises in some cities, one Midwestern mayor is welcoming the nation . . .

Koch Brothers' Summit Turns Into a Reid Bash

Tuesday, 02 Sep 2014 12:11 PM

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid took center stage as a figure of scorn and contempt at the annual summit of a conserva . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved