Tags:

One in 7 US Households Hit by Hunger Issues in 2009

Monday, 15 Nov 2010 07:02 PM

 

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink

* Emergency food pantry use up sharply in recent years

* Food stamps used by 15 million families a month in 2009

By Jerry Norton

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The number of U.S. households that reported getting emergency food from a food pantry almost doubled between 2007 and 2009, at the height of the recession, a government report said on Monday.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said the number of households jumped to 5.6 from 3.9 million.

"Households also accessed additional assistance through USDA's 15 food and nutrition assistance programs," the article in the USDA Economic Research Service (ERS) "Amber Waves" said.

The USDA oversees the government's food stamp program, also known as SNAP or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, for low-income families and other domestic feeding programs like school lunches.

In the 2009 fiscal year, "15.2 million households participated in SNAP in an average month, up from 12.7 million in FY 2008," the article said.

In a separate report, the ERS said the percentage of U.S. households without food security -- access to enough food for an active, healthy life -- at some point during the year hit a record in 2009.

It said more than 50 million people, including at least 17 million children, lived in households uncertain of having or getting enough food at some point because of insufficient money or other material resources.

The 14.7 percent of households without food security at some time in 2009 was up from 14.6 percent in 2008 and 11.1 in 2007, and was the highest since data-keeping on the subject began in 1995, according to the ERS report. (http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/FoodSecurity/)

Some 9 percent of households had low food security, meaning they relied on such strategies as "eating less varied diets, participating in Federal food assistance programs," or getting emergency food help.

About 6 percent had very low food security, meaning they had the normal eating patterns of one or more members disrupted and reduced at times during the year.

For about a quarter of food-insecure households and one-third of those with very low food security, "the occurrence was frequent or chronic," the ERS report said.

It said that among states, food insecurity ranged from a 6.7 percent level in North Dakota to a 17.7 percent high in Arkansas, as measured over a three year period through 2009. Very low food security ranged from North Dakota's 2.6 percent to Alabama's 6.8 percent.

(Editing by Peter Bohan and Sandra Maler)

© 2014 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

Report: Washington Full of Cell Phone Spying Devices

Thursday, 18 Sep 2014 22:12 PM

The Washington, D.C., area is littered with devices that spy on users' cellphones, and one expert thinks they were plant . . .

Man Kills Daughter, Six Grandchildren in Murder-Suicide

Thursday, 18 Sep 2014 21:43 PM

A 51-year-old Florida man shot dead his daughter and six grandchildren in his home before killing himself on Thursday, a . . .

New Chicago High School Won't Be Named After Obama

Thursday, 18 Sep 2014 21:23 PM

President Barack Obama's adopted hometown has nixed a plan to name a new high school after him. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanu . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved