Govt Fails to Issue Airline Rules on Musical Instruments

Friday, 14 Feb 2014 07:43 AM

 

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print   |
    A   A  
  Copy Shortlink

Federal transportation regulators are striking a sour note with musicians and their supporters in Congress.

Two years ago, Congress directed the Transportation Department to write regulations requiring airlines to accommodate musicians traveling with their instruments, so that the instruments don't get damaged or lost.

Final regulations are due Friday, but the department hasn't even started writing them. Transportation spokeswoman Meghan Keck said the agency doesn't have enough money to do the work needed to write the regulations.

The department, which regulates airlines on matters that affect consumers, asked for money in this year's budget for four more staff members to write regulations but was turned down by Congress.

The rules are supposed to implement a law requiring airlines to store instruments in closets and overhead bins where they fit. Travelers would be allowed to buy seats for larger instruments weighing less than 165 pounds.

Musicians have long complained that airlines frequently require that instruments be checked as baggage, with the result that they are often damaged or lost.

Guitarist and singer Dave Schneider watched as Delta Airlines employees yanked, pulled and ripped at his smashed 1965 Gibson ES-335 guitar, trying for more than an hour to free it from where it had been wedged between a service elevator and a loading dock in an airport baggage claim in December 2012. Schneider had begged Delta to let him carry the guitar on a flight from Buffalo, N.Y., to Detroit, but airline employees denied his request.

One such guitar was listed Thursday on eBay with a bid of $3,851.

Canadian musician Dave Carroll had a guitar smashed after a flight in 2009, and wrote a song and book about it, both called "United Breaks Guitars." Carroll's online video of his song was so popular — and so damaging to United Airlines — that it has become a business case study on how social media can harm a company's image.

More than 30 members of Congress signed a letter this week to Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx complaining about the delay.

"We understand the budgetary pinch that many agencies have found themselves in, but the relatively modest cost of promulgating this rule should not have hindered its completion," the letter said.

Musicians depend on their instruments for their livelihoods, the letter noted.

"We don't expect our airlines to carry a tune, but we do expect them to carry our precious instruments safely," Rep. Jim Cooper, D-Tenn., who organized the letter, said in a statement.


© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print   |
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

Sony's Lawyer: 'The Interview Will Be Distributed'

Monday, 22 Dec 2014 09:06 AM

Sony Pictures is planning to release the controversial movie “The Interview” at some stage, the company’s lawyer says. . . .

Medicare Extends Priority Appeals Process for Seniors

Monday, 22 Dec 2014 07:41 AM

The federal office responsible for appeals for Medicare coverage says that it will extend the policy that gives priority . . .

Another Hacker Group Warns Sony: Release 'Interview' or Else

Monday, 22 Dec 2014 07:24 AM

Competing pressures from different groups of hackers are being brought to bear on Sony Pictures over the decision not to . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved