Texas Voter ID Law Heads to Federal Court

Tuesday, 02 Sep 2014 06:29 AM

By Elliot Jager

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
A federal court in Corpus Christi will hear arguments this week on whether a Texas law requiring voters to show picture ID violates the Voting Rights Act, The New York Times reported.

The Justice Department, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Mexican American Legislative Caucus and other groups are challenging the law, passed by the Republican-controlled legislature, claiming that it discriminates against blacks and Hispanics, NPR reported. The state charges that the Justice Department has solely targeted "Southern, Republican-led states" while ignoring the concerns of white Republican voters, according to the Times.

Since the law passed in June 2013, voters need to present any of the following forms of photo identification in order to cast their vote: Texas driver's license, Election ID, Texas ID, handgun permit, U.S. military ID, U.S. citizenship certificate, or a United States passport. Identification can be obtained for free, though voters may have to pay to obtain a certified birth certificate in order to prove their identity in the first place.

"Voter ID has already been used in several elections in Texas without the disenfranchisement claimed by partisans who seem to be against election integrity," said  Lauren Bean, a spokeswoman for Texas attorney general Greg Abbott.

A loss for Texas would result in the federal government having to clear any changes in the state's election law – as had been the case until oversight was lifted by the Supreme Court when it nullified part of the Voting Rights Act in June 2013. In challenging the Texas law and asking preclearance to be reinstituted, the Justice Department is relying on other clauses of the Voting Rights Act that are unchanged by the court's ruling.

The law's opponents say not only are fees entailed in obtaining some of the ostensibly free IDs, but travel to a Department of Public Safety office is also required, and some voters have no cars or access to public transportation. The state has placed a mobile public safety office in every county to address some of these concerns.

The trial before Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos, an Obama appointee to the U.S.  District Court, is expected to last two to three weeks. It will likely be appealed regardless of the outcome, according to NPR.


Related Stories:

© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

US Crude Plunges 10% in Biggest One-Day Drop Since 2009

Friday, 28 Nov 2014 21:41 PM

U.S. crude tumbled 10 percent in its biggest one-day drop in more than five years on Friday, and benchmark Brent broke b . . .

Next Partisan 'War' in New Congress Will Be Over Science

Friday, 28 Nov 2014 19:58 PM

After midterm battles, an immigration standoff and amid a switch of power in Congress, the next political fight in Washi . . .

Protesters Chain Seattle Mall Doors Shut Over Ferguson

Friday, 28 Nov 2014 19:22 PM

Protesters angered by a grand jury's decision not to indict a white police officer for killing an unarmed black teenager . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved