Sheriff: We Knew of Rodger's Videos When We Checked Him

Thursday, 29 May 2014 10:31 PM

 

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Santa Barbara County sheriff's deputies who checked on Elliot Rodger three weeks before he killed six college students were aware he had posted disturbing videos but never viewed them before or after determining he was not a threat to himself or others, the department disclosed Thursday.

The statement from the sheriff's office corrected an earlier assertion that deputies were unaware of the videos when they checked on him on April 30. It also provided new details on the sequence of events during that pivotal visit to Rodger's apartment, a time when he was planning the rampage that would end with him apparently taking his own life after being wounded by police.

The guns he used in the killings last Friday were stashed inside his apartment at the time, but police did not search the residence or conduct a check to determine if he owned firearms because they didn't consider him a threat.

The statement does not explain why the videos were not viewed or whether the deputies knew anything about the contents beyond a description of them being "disturbing."

The sheriff's department also revealed new details about the timeline leading up to the killings. It said Rodger uploaded his final video to YouTube, titled "Day of Retribution" and detailing his plans and reasons for the killings, at 9:17 p.m. on the day of the shootings. One minute later, he emailed a lengthy written manifesto to his mother, father and therapist that also detailed his plans and contempt for everyone he felt was responsible for his sexual frustrations and overall miserable existence.

The first gunshots were reported at 9:27 p.m. The rampage was over and Rodger dead just eight minutes later.

It was another 25 minutes before the therapist saw the emailed manifesto and 11 more minutes until the sheriff's office was contacted at 10:11 p.m.

The timing indicates that Rodger stabbed to death three people in the apartment sometime earlier — his two roommates and a third man who might have been another roommate or a visitor at the time of the attack.

Rodger wrote in the manifesto about the April 30 visit by the deputies and said it prompted him to remove most of his videos from YouTube. He re-posted at least some of them in the week leading up to the killings. He wrote that the deputies asked him if he had suicidal thoughts, but "I tactfully told them that it was all a misunderstanding and they finally left. If they had demanded to search my room that would have ended everything."

According to the statement from the sheriff's office, four deputies, a police officer and a dispatcher in training were sent to Rodger's apartment after being informed by the county's mental health hotline that Rodger's therapist and mother were concerned about videos he posted online.

The visit lasted about 10 minutes, during which officers found him shy and polite. The deputies questioned him about the videos. Rodger told them he was having trouble fitting in socially and the videos were "merely a way of expressing himself."

Like many other states, California has a law intended to identify and confine dangerously unstable people before they can do harm. It allows authorities to hold people in a mental hospital for up to 72 hours for observation.

Because the deputies concluded Rodger was not a threat to himself or others, they never viewed the videos, searched his apartment or conducted a check to determine if he owned firearms, the statement said.

That sequence of events is different from a statement Sunday from spokeswoman Kelly Hoover, who said "the sheriff's office was not aware of any videos until after the shooting rampage occurred."

In a typical mental-health check, only two deputies would be dispatched. But deputies who were familiar with Rodger as a victim in a January petty theft case were in the area and also decided to go to his apartment.

Hoover did not respond immediately to an email seeking more information on why the deputies didn't watch the videos, the content of the videos and what specific information was relayed from the mother that prompted the check at his apartment.

© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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