Twelve States Challenge EPA Coal Plant Emissions Limits

Friday, 01 Aug 2014 07:48 PM

 

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print   |
    A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
A dozen states led by West Virginia sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to block a proposed rule that would limit carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants.

The states said a U.S. Supreme Court ruling prohibits the EPA from issuing power-plant rules under one section of the Clean Air Act, known as 111(d), when it has already regulated them under a separate section. The agency previously used the act to regulate hazardous air pollutants in 2012, according to the filing.

The high court ruled in 2011 that the “EPA may not employ section 111(d) if existing stationary sources of the pollution in question are regulated under...the ‘hazardous air pollutants’ program,” the states said in their filing in federal court in Washington.

Regulation of mercury and other toxics in 2012 “does not deprive EPA of the authority regulate CO2 emissions” under section 111(d), the EPA said in a memo accompanying the June rulemaking for carbon dioxide reduction.

Barring it from doing so would be inconsistent with Congress’s intent in 1990 Clean Air Act amendments requiring EPA to regulate more substances, the agency said.

Liz Purchia, an EPA spokeswoman, declined to comment on the lawsuit.

‘Laughable Lawsuit’

“This is a laughable lawsuit,” said David Doniger, a lawyer at the Natural Resources Defense Council, which supports the EPA’s efforts. “I don’t think the courts will take more than 15 minutes to dismiss this.”

Doniger also said the challenge is premature because the proposal has yet to become a final rule.

Meeting agency standards for reducing carbon dioxide would lead to $90 billion in climate and health benefits and cost utilities as much as $8.8 billion, according to the EPA.

The proposed regulation would permit states to achieve the reductions in carbon pollution by promoting renewable energy, encouraging greater use of natural gas, employing energy efficiency technologies or joining carbon trading markets. The regulations apply to existing power producers.

Separate rules governing new plants have already been proposed.

Co-filers in the West Virginia case are Alabama, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, South Carolina and Wyoming.

© Copyright 2014 Bloomberg News. All rights reserved.

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print   |
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

Muhammad Ali Hospitalized With Pneumonia

Saturday, 20 Dec 2014 23:27 PM

Boxing great Muhammad Ali was hospitalized with a mild case of pneumonia that was caught early and should result in a sh . . .

Chicago Mayor's Teenage Son Mugged near Home

Saturday, 20 Dec 2014 22:32 PM

A spokeswoman for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says the mayor's 17-year-old son was mugged near the family's home.Spokeswo . . .

Protesters Shut Down Part of Mall of America in Minnesota

Saturday, 20 Dec 2014 22:25 PM

More than 1,500 protesters against police violence shut down part of the Mall of America in Minnesota on Saturday, resul . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved