Thanksgiving Winter Storm Threatens Travel, Macy's Parade

Image: Thanksgiving Winter Storm Threatens Travel, Macy's Parade Travelers wait at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013.

Tuesday, 26 Nov 2013 11:15 AM

By Newsmax Wires

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
A winter storm system hitting parts of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas swept toward the densely populated East Coast on Tuesday, promising flight delays and prompting hazardous travel warnings ahead of the long holiday weekend. Even the Macy's Thanksgiving Parade is threatened.

John Robinson, the warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service in North Little Rock, said winter storm warnings were issued for parts of the eastern half of the United States through Wednesday afternoon.

Some of the country's busiest airports – New York, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Boston and Charlotte, N.C. – could see big flight delays at one of the peak travel times of the year.

Editor's Note: ObamaCare Is Here. Are You Prepared?

High winds could ground the giant character balloons in the Macy's Inc Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York, according to Reuters. City rules bar the huge balloons from flying when sustained winds top 23 miles per hour, and gusts exceed 34 mph.

Freezing rain from the storm had already contributed to the cancellation of 378 airline flights in the United States on Monday, most of them at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, according to FlightAware.com, which tracks delays and cancellations.

The large system has already struck parts of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas, but with temperatures creeping above freezing the outcome was less dramatic than forecasters had feared as it crossed the nation's midsection.

The storm sprung out of the West and has been blamed for at least 11 deaths, half of them in Texas. It limped across Arkansas with a smattering of snow, sleet and freezing rain that didn't meet expectations, according to The Associated Press.

"It's just really cold. We had drizzle but no snow," said Courtney O'Neal-Walden, an owner of the Dairyette diner on U.S. 270 in Mount Ida, Ark. "You can see (ice) on the power lines but the roads are fine."

She said ominous warnings of a winter storm kept most people in – though schools remained open – and few stopped by the diner for Monday's $5.99 special of popcorn shrimp, fries and a medium drink.

But the system packed plenty of punch as it moved eastward.

This holiday will likely see the most air travelers since 2007, according to Airlines for America, the industry's trade and lobbying group, with the busiest day being Sunday, an estimated 2.56 million passengers. Wednesday is expected to be the second-busiest with 2.42 million passengers.

Ninety percent of travelers this week will drive, according to AAA, and an estimated 38.9 million people – 1.6 percent fewer than last year – are expected to drive 50 miles or more from their home.

In New Jersey, officials advised travelers to check with their airlines and reduce speed on highways as a winter weather advisory was set to take effect shortly before midday across the state's northwest areas.

Meanwhile, forecasters were predicting 5 to 8 inches of snow in Buffalo, more in the northern Adirondacks, and a winter storm watch was posted for central New York state with heavy rain expected in parts of the Hudson Valley.

The Appalachian Mountains, West Virginia, western Pennsylvania and northern New York could get 6 to 12 inches of snow on Wednesday before the storm moves into western Maine on Thursday, weather service meteorologist Dan Petersen said.

East of the snow front, the I-95 highway corridor from Boston to New York could receive 2 to 3-1/2 inches of rain, he said.

"The storm is going to occur from (Monday night) through Wednesday, and it will be pretty much out of the area" by Thursday, he said.

"Thanksgiving will be just blustery and chilly and windy across the (Great) Lakes and Northeast."

In the nation's capital, federal agencies opened Tuesday though the National Weather Service issued a winter weather advisory for the northern and western suburbs of Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, amid forecasts of a light mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain that could be topped off by heavy rain.

The U.S. Office of Personnel Management, which sets leave policies for 300,000 federal workers in Washington, said that while government was open Tuesday, employees could take unscheduled leave or unscheduled telework.

Editor's Note: Do You Support Obamacare? Vote in Urgent National Poll

Parts of the Southeast also were bracing, with a freezing rain advisory in effect for parts of South Carolina.

Jeff Smidt hopes to travel from his home in Toronto on Wednesday to visit his family near Boston. He plans to drive if he cannot fly.

"My understanding is that I'm traveling at like the worst time ever," Smidt said. He tried to change his JetBlue reservation to get on an earlier flight but was told the airline wasn't waiving any change fees yet.

"Worst comes to worst, it will be an eight-hour trek down Interstate 90," he said.

© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Send me more news as it happens.
 
 
Get me on The Wire
Send me more news as it happens.
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Retype Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Top Stories

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved