Tags: solar eclipse | tips | glasses | totality

8 Eclipse Tips: Everything You Need Know Ahead of Monday's Event

Image: 8 Eclipse Tips: Everything You Need Know Ahead of Monday's Event
In this Aug. 31, 1932, file photo, eclipse watchers squint through protective film as they view a partial eclipse. (AP Photo, File)

By    |   Monday, 21 Aug 2017 05:56 AM

A total solar eclipse will darken skies across America on Monday, August 21. For avid star-gazers and first-timers alike, this notable celestial event is set to be an unforgettable experience.

Here are some tips and notable points you should know ahead of the upcoming total solar eclipse:

1. It’s been titled the Great American Total Solar Eclipse — Aptly named for its high visibility across a large number of U.S. states, the total solar eclipse will span a narrow path all the way from the West Coast to the East Coast. Surrounding areas will also experience some degree of this this lunar phenomenon in the form of a partial solar eclipse.

2. A once-in-a-lifetime event — Although total solar eclipses happen every three years on average, this one is particularly special. According to National Geographic, the Great American Total Solar Eclipse will be the first total solar eclipse since 1918 to go coast to coast across the United States.

3. Daytime stargazing — If you are in the path of totality and the weather is on your side, the sky will darken significantly. This means that stars, which are usually hidden by the sun, will likely be visible to the naked eye. Keep an eye out for the twinkling lights of Mars, Jupiter, Mercury, and Venus during these precious moments of totality. 

4. It’s a long journey with a big audience — The total solar eclipse will be visible for a stretch about 70 miles wide and 2,500 miles diagonally, moving from West to East. Depending on your location in this path, the moon will eclipse the sun entirely for up to 2 minutes and 40 seconds. According to NASA, an estimated 500 million people will be able to observe this majestic event, in partial or total form.

5. Where and when to see it — This eclipse will become visible first in the state of Oregon and then cross through Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North Carolina before "ending" in South Carolina. The eclipse will start at 9:06 a.m. PDT in Madras, Oregon, and will end in entirety at 16:06 p.m. EDT in Columbia, South Carolina. Space.com has created a comprehensive map for those wishing to catch a glimpse of the moon vying for its moment in the spotlight.

6. Eye protection is vital – It is always inadvisable to look directly at the sun to avoid risking permanent eye damage. Should you wish to view the total or partial solar eclipse, use special glasses made from a solar filter. Although it is quite safe to look at the eclipse during the moment of totality, it is safer to wear eye protection. That way you can also watch the moon’s entire movement over the sun.

7. Preparing for the eclipse – If you’re in the path of the eclipse, whether partial or total, make use of these extensive guides and maps, courtesy of GreatAmericanEclipse.com. Consider the weather forecast for your area and any potential cloud cover that may hinder your viewing. You can also choose an ideal location for viewing, such as a large outdoor area.

8. Watch it anywhere around the world – If you want to experience the Great American Total Solar Eclipse but are not in America or on the eclipse path, the NASA Exploratorium will be live-streaming the eclipse from locations in Oregon and Wyoming.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
TheWire
A total solar eclipse will darken skies across America on Monday, August 21. For avid star-gazers and first-timers alike, this notable celestial event is set to be an unforgettable experience.
solar eclipse, tips, glasses, totality
564
2017-56-21
Monday, 21 Aug 2017 05:56 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved