Hurricane Raymond Aims at Mexico Pacific Coast as Category 3

Image: Hurricane Raymond Aims at Mexico Pacific Coast as Category 3 Already flooded Acapulco, Mexico, is on alert as Hurricane Raymond approaches, Oct. 21, 2013.

Tuesday, 22 Oct 2013 10:01 AM

By Michael Mullins

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Hurricane Raymond was fast approaching Mexico's southern Pacific coastline, having been upgraded to a Category 3 storm early Monday.

Nature's latest assault on the region comes after months of severe weather conditions killed hundreds through widespread flooding and mudslides across Mexico caused by Hurricane Manuel and other severe weather earlier in the year.

Though Hurricane Raymond had developed and temporarily stalled to the South of Mexico, the storm is expected to move closer to the coast in the coming days due to a general northward drift.

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"The cold front coming down is what makes it (Raymond) turn to the left, but that is a model," David Korenfeld, head of Mexico's National Water Commission, told the Associated Press with regards to Hurricane Raymond. "If that cold front comes down more slowly, this tropical storm ... can get closer to the coast."

In response to the storm's shift toward Mexico's coast, the country has deployed emergency crews to the region to help evacuate residents in low-lying areas.

Approximately 10,000 people have already been evacuated from areas that are thought to be in Hurricane Raymond's path due to previous storms that have affected the same region, the AP noted.

"There will be rain for the next 72 hours along the Pacific coast — very heavy rain, torrential rain," Korenfeld projected.

As of early Monday, Hurricane Raymond had maximum sustained winds of 120 mph and was centered approximately 125 miles south-southwest of the beach resort of Zihuatanejo.

Hurricane Raymond triggered a tropical storm warning from the Mexican city of Tecpán de Galeana to Acapulco.

Despite the storm warnings and the fact that local officials have released water from about 50 dams in the area due to over capacity tourists are still reportedly flocking to the region.

"We've got bookings coming in, people are coming in," London native Les Johnson, an employee at the Our House bed and breakfast in Zihuatanejo, told the AP. "There's people on the beach, it's quite nice. . . There's no problem at the moment."

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Just one month earlier, some 40,000 tourists were stranded for days in Acapulco after landslides blocked major highways in and out of the resort town.

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