Tags: IRS | Law Enforcement | charles h. ramsey | philadelphia

451 Times Police Departments Rehired Fired Officers

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Charles H. Ramsey, Commissioner of the Philadelphia Police Dept. (2008-2016) speaks at Discovery Education's My Brother's Keeper town hall at School of the Future on May 7, 2015 in Philadelphia. (Mark Stehle/AP)

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Friday, 11 Aug 2017 10:43 AM Current | Bio | Archive

A Washington Post study found that 37 large police departments around the nation have fired 1,881 officers since 2006. However, the departments were later forced to rehire 451 of them. In other words, roughly one out of four fired officers were later rehired (24 percent).[1]

The firings stemmed from behavior including "challenging a handcuffed man to fight . . . sexually abusing a young woman in his patrol car . . . and driving a suspected gunman from the scene of a nightclub killing.”[1]

An earlier Number of The Day showed that during a 15-month period, the IRS rehired 213 employees who had left due to misconduct. That happened because the IRS officials deciding whom to hire were not provided with past IRS employment history. The IRS said the cost involved in providing such information was "not likely [to] yield a reasonable return on investment."

In contrast, the police officers were able to regain their positions due to union contract rules, with all 37 police departments having "a police union contract that guarantees an appeal of disciplinary measures."[1] The Post found that most of the 451 "regained their jobs when police chiefs were overruled by arbitrators, typically lawyers hired to review the process. In many cases, the underlying misconduct was undisputed, but arbitrators often concluded that the firings were unjustified because departments had been too harsh, missed deadlines, lacked sufficient evidence or failed to interview witnesses."[1]

Charles H. Ramsey, a former Philadelphia police commissioner, told the Post, "It’s demoralizing to the rank and file who really don’t want to have those kinds of people in their ranks."

Scott Rasmussen’s Number of the Day is published by Ballotpedia. Each weekday, Scott Rasmussen’s Number of the Day explores interesting and newsworthy topics at the intersection of culture, politics, and technology.

Scott Rasmussen is a Senior Fellow for the Study of Self-Governance at the King’s College in New York and an Editor-At-Large for Ballotpedia, the Encyclopedia of American Politics. His most recent book, "Politics Has Failed: America Will Not," was published by the Sutherland Institute in May.To read more of his reports — Click Here Now.

Footnotes:

The Washington Post, "Fired/Rehired: Police chiefs are often forced to put officers fired for misconduct back on the streets," August 3, 2017

 

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Roughly one out of four fired officers were later rehired. Some police officers were able to regain their positions due to union contract rules.
charles h. ramsey, philadelphia
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2017-43-11
Friday, 11 Aug 2017 10:43 AM
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