NASA Scientist: Don't Believe Climate Change Headlines

Thursday, 03 Jul 2014 03:19 PM

By Courtney Coren

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The Antarctic sea ice has reached a record high, but other reports show there is a loss of ice in the arctic, which is why Dr. Gavin Schmidt, head of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies says not to "believe what you read in headlines" about climate change. 

"You have to look into what people are actually talking about," Schmidt told Ed Berliner on "MidPoint" on Newsmax TV on Thursday. 

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The head of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies says that those who are interested should do their own research.

"There's some great data sources out there," he explained. "The National Sea and Ice Data Center has great graphics and data on Antarctic's sea ice and arctic sea ice where you can look at what the anomalies are, you can look at the trends, you can download the data for yourself."

Schmidt said that "the situation" with growing and melting ice "is complicated."

"In the arctic, we're seeing losses of ice in every month, in every season that are getting very dramatic," he explained. "These are things that we haven't seen in perhaps thousands of years."

"In Antarctica, things are complicated because of the Ozone hole, that's another man-made issue that's changing the winds around Antarctica that's having an effect on the sea ice," Schmidt said. "We are seeing slight increases in sea ice there, though it's kind of regional."

"There's some places where it's going down a lot, other places where it's increasing a little," he added. "That's a real puzzle for us."

One of things that makes Antarctica complicated is that there is "ice on the land of Antarctica and there we can see that there's actually increased melting at the same time that you've got increased sea ice right next to it," he said.

According to the NASA scientist, the "climate has changed over the history of the planet many, many times for many, many different causes," but that we understand a lot "more about what's going on right now because we have far more data."

"When it comes to just what's been going on in the recent decades, we can actually do a pretty good job on attribution of the global mean changes," he explained. "That's the average over the whole planet to human activity — that's mostly related to carbon dioxide."

"For the global mean temperature, all of almost all of the rise is man-made," Schmidt added.

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