Tags: US | Jobless | Aid | Taxes

Senate Passes Jobless Aid, Business Tax Breaks

Wednesday, 10 Mar 2010 06:37 PM

 

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink

The Senate voted Wednesday to extend key pieces of last year's economic stimulus measure, including help for the jobless and money to help financially strapped states pay for health care for the poor.

The 62-36 vote came over protests from conservatives who say the bill adds too much to the $12.5 trillion national debt. Six Republicans joined all but one Democrat, Ben Nelson of Nebraska, in voting for the bill.

The plight of the jobless and the political power of an annual package of tax breaks powered the measure through the Senate, even though it would add more than $130 billion to the budget deficit over the next year and a half.

"The bill is not a second stimulus, but it's going to deliver badly needed relief to Americans who are hurting," said Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. "It would be cruel, even inhumane, to tell these people that their unemployment benefits expire."

The measure is the second piece of the Democrats' much-touted "jobs agenda" to pass the Senate this year, with more elements promised, such as help for small businesses suffering from a credit crunch. Concern over out-of-control budget deficits are a big challenge to the success of the agenda.

In fact, the bill chiefly resurrects elements of the stimulus bill that expired at the end of last year, including more generous unemployment benefits, health care subsidies for the jobless, and Medicaid aid to cash-starved states.

The vote sends the measure into talks with the House, which is wary about some Senate provisions included to defray the measure's impact on the deficit since they may want to use such "offsets" to help finance an overhaul of the health care system.

Democrats also hope to finish work this week on a far smaller job-creation measure blending additional highway spending with new tax breaks for companies that hire the unemployed.

Wednesday's larger bill would provide unemployment benefits of up to 99 weeks in many states for people mired in joblessness as the economy slowly recovers from the worst recession in decades.

The measure illustrates the great extent to which direct help for the jobless and the poor makes up a large portion of Democrats' election-year agenda on jobs — and threatens to squeeze out other items amid concerns about a budget deficit.

The sweeping bill cleans up a host of unfinished congressional business from last year that languished as the Senate focused on health care. It would also prevent doctors from absorbing a 21 percent cut in Medicare payments and extends through December a generous 65 percent subsidy of health insurance premiums for the unemployed under the COBRA program, at a cost of $10 billion.

Wednesday's larger bill also provides the annual extension of $26 billion worth of tax breaks for businesses and individuals that are popular with senators in both parties and swung support from business lobbyists behind the legislation.

The $59 billion cost of providing additional months of unemployment checks — the core benefit is 26 weeks — is added directly to a budget deficit expected to hit $1.6 trillion this year.

But Democrats said it would be heartless to cut off unemployment benefits to the long-term jobless and contended that the benefits inject demand into the economy, helping to lift it.

Federal cash to help states with Medicaid adds about $25 billion more to the legislation, with the money helping states not only keep poor people on the program but in many cases free up resources to forestall layoffs of teachers, police and other public employees.

The tax breaks include a property tax deduction for people who don't itemize, lucrative credits that help businesses finance research and development and a sales tax deduction that mainly helps people in the nine states without income taxes.

To defray the impact on the deficit, the measure helps the Internal Revenue Service crack down on abusive tax shelters and would block paper companies from claiming a tax credit from burning "black liquor," a pulp-making byproduct, as if it were an alternative fuel.

Other tax breaks include a deduction for college tuition for couples making less than $160,000 a year, and one for teachers who use their own money to buy school supplies. There is a tax credit for community development agencies that invest in low-income neighborhoods, as well as a tax break for restaurant owners and retailers who remodel their stores.

There are several energy-related credits, including one for installing energy-efficiency improvements to new homes and a $1 per gallon credit for the production of biodiesel.

© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Retype Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
You May Also Like

Al Jazeera Blasts Al Gore as Fight Over TV Deal Gets Nasty

Tuesday, 19 Aug 2014 18:20 PM

Al Jazeera on Tuesday rejected allegations from Al Gore and Joel Hyatt, the founders of Current TV, saying they were fal . . .

Uber Hires Former Obama Adviser Plouffe to Counter Opponents

Tuesday, 19 Aug 2014 15:16 PM

(Updates with Kalanick comments in seventh paragraph.)Aug. 19 (Bloomberg) -- Uber Technologies Inc. is adding to its exe . . .

98 Percent of California Still at 'Severe' Drought Level or Worse

Monday, 18 Aug 2014 19:34 PM

Even though California's drought is no longer worsening, 98 percent of the state is at least at the Severe level, the  . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved