Tax Writers Promise 50 Years Of Secrecy For Reform Suggestions

Thursday, 25 Jul 2013 01:51 AM

By Matthew Auerbach

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus, D-Mont., and Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, the panel’s ranking Republican, have guaranteed their fellow senators a half-century’s worth of secrecy for any suggestions they provide concerning what deductions and credits should be saved in tax reform.

The Senate’s top tax writers gave their promise that any recommendations they receive from lawmakers will be kept from view by both the committee and the National Archives until the end of 2064, according to The Hill.

Baucus and Hatch have said only 10 staff members will have access to the suggestions and each one will be provided its own ID number and be kept on password-protected servers, with hard copies to be kept in locked safes.

The confidentiality guarantee was made public just 48 hours before the deadline for lawmakers’ involvement in the Finance Committee’s “blank slate” process, in which the they put forth their submissions regarding what credits and deductions should be kept in a streamlined tax code.

A Finance Committee aide said Baucus and Hatch made the promise of secrecy as a way to show colleagues how serious they are about confidentiality, The Hill says.

Last week, members of the panel sent a memo to senators filling them in on the deal.

“The letter was done at the request of offices to provide some assurance that the committee would not make their submissions public,” the aide said. “Sens. Baucus and Hatch are going out of their way to assure their colleagues they will keep the submissions in confidence.”

Keeping the submissions confidential for 50 years, the aide added, was “standard operating procedure for sensitive materials, including investigation materials.”

Baucus fully expects more senators to participate in writing because of the secrecy guarantee.

“Several senators have said to me how important that is to them,” Baucus said. “It’s quite significant.”

The need for privacy is paramount for senators who have to deal with possible pushback from interest groups and businesses in their home states.

Some lawmakers say the blank slate forces them to choose sides on tax breaks that can have passionate backers back home and make them appear to be favoring special interests.

© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

Christie Continues to Stoke 2016 Rumors

Tuesday, 21 Oct 2014 18:26 PM

Referring to himself as "a mercenary," New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said Tuesday he "will think about" running for pre . . .

New York Congressman's Trial Put Off Until 2015

Tuesday, 21 Oct 2014 17:59 PM

A New York congressman's tax evasion trial has been put off until next year.U.S. District Judge Pamela Chen told lawyers . . .

Hillary: Dems Must Get Out and Vote in Midterms

Tuesday, 21 Oct 2014 17:03 PM

Hillary Clinton, in a passionately political speech, accused Republicans of national "amnesia" about failed GOP policies . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved